UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Microparticle-mediated VZV propagation and endothelial activation: Mechanism of VZV vasculopathy

Eleftheriou, D; Moraitis, E; Hong, Y; Turmaine, M; Venturini, C; Ganesan, V; Breuer, J; ... Brogan, P; + view all (2019) Microparticle-mediated VZV propagation and endothelial activation: Mechanism of VZV vasculopathy. Neurology 10.1212/WNL.0000000000008885. (In press). Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
WNL.0000000000008885.full.pdf - Published version

Download (5MB) | Preview

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Varicella zoster virus (VZV) can spread anterogradely and infect cerebral arteries causing VZV vasculopathy and arterial ischemic stroke. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that virus-infected cerebrovascular fibroblasts undergo phenotypic changes that promote vascular remodeling and facilitate virus transmission in an in vitro model of VZV vasculopathy. The aims of this project were therefore to examine the changes that virus-infected human brain adventitial vascular fibroblasts (HBVAFs) undergo in an in vitro model of VZV vasculopathy and to identify disease biomarkers relating to VZV-related vasculopathy. METHODS: HBVAFs were infected with VZV, and their ability to migrate, proliferate, transdifferentiate, and interact with endothelial cells was studied with flow cytometry. Microparticles (MPs) released from these cells were isolated and imaged with transmission electron microscopy, and their protein content was analyzed with mass spectrometry. Circulating MP profiles were also studied in children with VZV and non-VZV vasculopathy and compared with controls. RESULTS: VZV-infected HBVAFs transdifferentiated into myofibroblasts with enhanced proliferative and migratory capacity. Interaction of VZV-infected HBVAFs with endothelial cells resulted in endothelial dysfunction. These effects were, in part, mediated by the release of MPs from VZV-infected HBVAFs. These MPs contained VZV virions that could transmit VZV to neighboring cells, highlighting a novel model of VZV cell-to-cell viral dissemination. MPs positive for VZV were significantly higher in children with VZV-related vasculopathy compared to children with non-VZV vasculopathy (p = 0.01) and controls (p = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: VZV-infected HBVAFs promote vascular remodeling and facilitate virus transmission. These effects were mediated by the release of apoptotic MPs that could transmit VZV infection to neighboring cells through a Trojan horse means of productive viral infection. VZV+ MPs may represent a disease biomarker worthy of further study.

Type: Article
Title: Microparticle-mediated VZV propagation and endothelial activation: Mechanism of VZV vasculopathy
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000008885
Publisher version: https://doi.org/ 10.1212/WNL.0000000000008885
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Neurosciences Dept
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10089111
Downloads since deposit
6Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item