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The Relationship of Early-Life Adversity With Adulthood Weight and Cardiometabolic Health Status in the 1946 National Survey of Health and Development

Robson, E; Norris, T; Wulaningsih, W; Hamer, M; Hardy, R; Johnson, W; (2020) The Relationship of Early-Life Adversity With Adulthood Weight and Cardiometabolic Health Status in the 1946 National Survey of Health and Development. Psychosomatic Medicine , 82 (1) pp. 82-89. 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000751. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Evidence linking early-life adversity with an adverse cardiometabolic profile in adulthood is equivocal. This study investigates early-life adversity in relation to weight and cardiometabolic health status at ages 60 to 64 years. METHODS: We included 1059 individuals from the 1946 National Survey of Health and Development. Data on adversity between ages 0 to 15 years were used to create a cumulative childhood psychosocial adversity score and a socioeconomic adversity score. Cardiometabolic and weight/height data collected at ages 60 to 64 years were used to create four groups: metabolically healthy normal weight, metabolically unhealthy normal weight, metabolically healthy overweight/obese, and metabolically unhealthy overweight/obese. Associations between the two exposure scores and weight/health status were examined using multinomial logistic regression, with adjustment for sex and age at the outcome visit. RESULTS: Sixty-two percent of normal-weight individuals were metabolically healthy, whereas only 34% of overweight/obese individuals were metabolically healthy. In a mutually adjusted model including both exposure scores, a psychosocial score of ≥3 (compared with 0) was associated with increased risk of being metabolically unhealthy (compared with healthy) in both normal-weight adults (relative risk = 2.49; 95% confidence interval = 0.87–7.13) and overweight/obese adults (1.87; 0.96–3.61). However, the socioeconomic adversity score was more strongly related to metabolic health status in overweight/obese adults (1.60; 0.98–2.60) than in normal-weight adults (0.95; 0.46–1.96). CONCLUSIONS: Independently of socioeconomic adversity, psychosocial adversity in childhood may be associated with a poor cardiometabolic health profile, in both normal-weight and overweight/obese adults. Childhood adversity might cause obesity via the adoption of unhealthy behaviors. It might also cause poor cardiometabolic health, either via obesity or via another pathway (e.g., altered stress response). Robson et al. found that childhood adversity was associated with poor cardiometabolic health at ages 60 to 64 years, in both normal-weight and overweight/obese adults. Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms by which childhood adversity might affect cardiometabolic health without necessarily increasing body weight.

Type: Article
Title: The Relationship of Early-Life Adversity With Adulthood Weight and Cardiometabolic Health Status in the 1946 National Survey of Health and Development
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000751
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0000000000000751
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10088718
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