UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Lung Screen Uptake Trial (LSUT): Randomised Controlled Trial Testing Targeted Invitation Materials

Quaife, SL; Ruparel, M; Dickson, JL; Beeken, RJ; McEwen, A; Baldwin, DR; Bhowmik, A; ... Janes, SM; + view all (2019) Lung Screen Uptake Trial (LSUT): Randomised Controlled Trial Testing Targeted Invitation Materials. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 10.1164/rccm.201905-0946OC. (In press). Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Dickson_Lung Screen Uptake Trial (LSUT). Randomised Controlled Trial Testing Targeted Invitation Materials_AAM.pdf - Accepted version

Download (9MB) | Preview

Abstract

RATIONALE: Low uptake of low-dose CT (LDCT) lung cancer screening, particularly by current smokers of a low socioeconomic position, compromises effectiveness and equity. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of a ‘targeted, low burden and stepped’ invitation strategy versus control, on uptake of hospital-based ‘Lung Health Check’ appointments offering (LDCT) screening. METHODS: A two-arm, blinded, between-subjects, randomised controlled trial. 2012 participants were selected from 16 primary care practices using these criteria: i) aged 60-75, ii) recorded as a current smoker within the last seven years, iii) no pre-specified exclusion criteria contraindicating LDCT screening. Both groups received a stepped sequence of pre-invitation, invitation and reminder letters from their Primary Care Practitioner offering pre-scheduled appointments. The key manipulation was the accompanying leaflet. The intervention group’s leaflet targeted psychological barriers and provided low burden information, mimicking the concept of the UK Ministry of Transport’s annual vehicle test (‘MOT for your lungs’). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Uptake was 52.6%, with no difference between intervention (52.3%) and control (52.9%) groups in unadjusted (OR: 0.98, 0.82-1.16) or adjusted (aOR: 0.98, 0.82-1.17) analyses. Current smokers were less likely to attend (aOR: 0.70, 0.56-0.86) than former smokers. Socioeconomic deprivation was significantly associated with lower uptake for the control group only (p<.01). CONCLUSIONS: The intervention did not improve uptake. Regardless of trial arm, uptake was considerably higher than previous clinical and real world studies, particularly given the sample were predominantly lower socioeconomic position smokers. Strategies common to both groups, including a Lung Health Check approach, could represent a minimum standard.

Type: Article
Title: Lung Screen Uptake Trial (LSUT): Randomised Controlled Trial Testing Targeted Invitation Materials
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1164/rccm.201905-0946OC
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201905-0946OC
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Lung Neoplasms; Early Detection of Cancer; Behavioural Sciences; Socioeconomic Factors
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Respiratory Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10088185
Downloads since deposit
25Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item