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Olfactory ensheathing cells from the nasal mucosa and olfactory bulb have distinct membrane properties

Smith, KE; Whitcroft, K; Law, S; Andrews, P; Choi, D; Jagger, DJ; (2020) Olfactory ensheathing cells from the nasal mucosa and olfactory bulb have distinct membrane properties. Journal of Neuroscience Research , 98 (5) pp. 888-901. 10.1002/jnr.24566. Green open access

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Abstract

Transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) is a potential therapy for the regeneration of damaged neurons. While they maintain tissue homeostasis in the olfactory mucosa (OM) and olfactory bulb (OB), their regenerative properties also support the normal sense of smell by enabling continual turnover and axonal regrowth of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). However, the molecular physiology of OECs is not fully understood, especially that of OECs from the mucosa. Here, we carried out whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from individual OECs cultured from the OM and OB of the adult rat, and from the human OM. A subset of OECs from the rat OM cultured 1-3 days in vitro had large weakly rectifying K+ currents, which were sensitive to Ba2+ and desipramine, blockers of Kir4-family channels. Kir4.1 immunofluorescence was detectable in cultured OM cells colabeled for the OEC marker S100, and in S100-labeled cells found adjacent to OSN axons in mucosal sections. OECs cultured from rat OB had distinct properties though, displaying strongly rectifying inward currents at hyperpolarized membrane potentials and strongly rectifying outward currents at depolarized potentials. Kir4.1 immunofluorescence was not evident in OECs adjacent to axons of OSNs in the OB. A subset of human OECs cultured from the OM of adults had membrane properties comparable to those of the rat OM that is dominated by Ba2+ -sensitive weak inwardly rectifying currents. The membrane properties of peripheral OECs are different to those of central OECs, suggesting they may play distinct roles during olfaction.

Type: Article
Title: Olfactory ensheathing cells from the nasal mucosa and olfactory bulb have distinct membrane properties
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/jnr.24566
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/jnr.24566
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: RRID:AB_10013383, RRID:AB_141607, RRID:AB_162543, RRID:AB_2040120, RRID:AB_2313773, RRID:AB_2340962, RRID:AB_2534117, RRID:AB_2535739, RRID:AB_2535775, RRID:AB_664696, electrophysiology, glia, ion channels, olfaction, patch clamp
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > The Ear Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Brain Repair and Rehabilitation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH - Laboratory Management
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10087895
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