UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Evidence of structural cavities in 3D printed acetabular cups for total hip arthroplasty

Hothi, H; Dall'Ava, L; Henckel, J; Di Laura, A; Iacoviello, F; Shearing, P; Hart, A; (2020) Evidence of structural cavities in 3D printed acetabular cups for total hip arthroplasty. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials , 108 (5) pp. 1779-1789. 10.1002/jbm.b.34520. Green open access

[thumbnail of Dall'Ava_Evidence of structural cavities in 3D printed acetabular cups for total hip arthroplasty_AAM.pdf]
Preview
Text
Dall'Ava_Evidence of structural cavities in 3D printed acetabular cups for total hip arthroplasty_AAM.pdf - Accepted version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

The use of three‐dimensional (3D) printing to manufacture off‐the‐shelf titanium acetabular cups for hip arthroplasty has increased; however, the impact of this manufacturing technology is yet not fully understood. Although several studies have described the presence of structural cavities in 3D printed parts, there has been no analysis of full postproduction acetabular components. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 3D printing on the material structure of acetabular implants, first comparing different designs of 3D printed cups, second comparing 3D printed with conventionally manufactured cups. Two of the 3D printed cups were produced using electron beam melting (EBM), one using laser rapid manufacturing (LRM). The investigation was performed using X‐ray microcomputed tomography, imaging both the entire cups and samples sectioned from different regions of each cup. All 3D printed cups showed evidence of structural cavities; these were uniformly distributed in the volume of the samples and exhibited a prevalent spherical shape. The LRM‐manufactured cup had significantly higher cavity density (p = .0286), with a median of 21 cavities/mm^{3} compared to 3.5 cavities/mm^{3} for EBM cups. However, the cavity size was similar, with a median of 20 μm (p = .7385). The conventional cups showed a complete absence of distinguishable cavities. The presence of cavities is a known limitation of the 3D printing technology; however, it is noteworthy that we found them in orthopedic implants used in patients. Although this may impact their mechanical properties, to date, 3D printed cups have not been reported to encounter such failures.

Type: Article
Title: Evidence of structural cavities in 3D printed acetabular cups for total hip arthroplasty
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/jbm.b.34520
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34520
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: 3D printing, acetabular cups, additive manufacturing, orthopedic implants, structural cavities
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Ortho and MSK Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Chemical Engineering
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Mechanical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10087682
Downloads since deposit
53Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item