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Automated white matter hyperintensity segmentation using Bayesian Model Selection: assessment and correlations with cognitive change

Fiford, C; Sudre, C; Pemberton, H; Walsh, P; Manning, E; Malone, I; Nicholas, J; ... Barnes, J; + view all (2020) Automated white matter hyperintensity segmentation using Bayesian Model Selection: assessment and correlations with cognitive change. NeuroInformatics 10.1007/s12021-019-09439-6. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Accurate, automated white matter hyperintensity (WMH) segmentations are needed for large-scale studies to understand contributions of WMH to neurological diseases. We evaluated Bayesian Model Selection (BaMoS), a hierarchical fully-unsupervised model selection framework for WMH segmentation. We compared BaMoS segmentations to semi-automated segmentations, and assessed whether they predicted longitudinal cognitive change in control, early Mild Cognitive Impairment (EMCI), late Mild Cognitive Impairment (LMCI), subjective/significant memory concern (SMC) and Alzheimer’s (AD) participants. Data were downloaded from the Alzheimer’s disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Magnetic resonance images from 30 control and 30 AD participants were selected to incorporate multiple scanners, and were semi-automatically segmented by 4 raters and BaMoS. Segmentations were assessed using volume correlation, Dice score, and other spatial metrics. Linear mixed-effect models were fitted to 180 control, 107 SMC, 320 EMCI, 171 LMCI and 151 AD participants separately in each group, with the outcomes being cognitive change (e.g. mini-mental state examination; MMSE), and BaMoS WMH, age, sex, race and education used as predictors. There was a high level of agreement between BaMoS’ WMH segmentation volumes and a consensus of rater segmentations, with a median Dice score of 0.74 and correlation coefficient of 0.96. BaMoS WMH predicted cognitive change in: control, EMCI, and SMC groups using MMSE; LMCI using clinical dementia rating scale; and EMCI using Alzheimer’s disease assessment scale-cognitive subscale (p < 0.05, all tests). BaMoS compares well to semi-automated segmentation, is robust to different WMH loads and scanners, and can generate volumes which predict decline. BaMoS can be applicable to further large-scale studies.

Type: Article
Title: Automated white matter hyperintensity segmentation using Bayesian Model Selection: assessment and correlations with cognitive change
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s12021-019-09439-6
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12021-019-09439-6
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: White matter hyperintensities . Automated segmentation . Magnetic resonance imaging . Neurodegeneration . Vascular pathology . Alzheimer’s disease
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neurodegenerative Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10087426
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