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Gender differences in thermal comfort on pedestrian streets in cold and transitional seasons in severe cold regions in China

Jin, H; Liu, S; Kang, J; (2020) Gender differences in thermal comfort on pedestrian streets in cold and transitional seasons in severe cold regions in China. Building and Environment , 168 , Article 106488. 10.1016/j.buildenv.2019.106488.

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Abstract

Some non-meteorological elements can affect thermal comfort in outdoor spaces; among these, gender is a significant factor. Based on a field study conducted during cold and transitional seasons in Harbin, which is in a severe cold region, this study analyses gender differences in thermal comfort by considering three factors: thermal comfort level, affecting factors, and self-regulation. Regarding thermal comfort level, the mean thermal sensation vote (MTSV) under the same universal thermal climate index (UTCI) is lower for females compared to males. In transitional seasons, females' neutral temperature (23.2 °C UTCI) was higher than males'(19.8 °C UTCI). In cold season, the UTCI range of males’ acceptable ratio to thermal environment higher than 80% was −15.34 to −8.09 °C. This ratio for females was always below 80%, and only approached 80% (79.24%) at −11.33 °C UTCI. Regarding thermal preference, in the same thermal environment, females were more likely to prefer higher temperatures, while males were more likely to prefer lower wind speeds. When exposed to the same solar irradiation intensity, a higher proportion of females (than males) expected stronger sunshine, regardless of the solar radiation level. Regarding factors affecting thermal comfort, only air temperature influenced thermal comfort in the cold season. In transitional seasons, air temperature and solar radiation impacted thermal comfort. Regarding ways to regulate thermal comfort, females wear thicker clothes in the cold season, while males actively move about. Therefore, males are more likely to exercise, whereas females are more likely to go indoors or move to sunshine/shade.

Type: Article
Title: Gender differences in thermal comfort on pedestrian streets in cold and transitional seasons in severe cold regions in China
DOI: 10.1016/j.buildenv.2019.106488
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2019.106488
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Thermal comfort, Gender, Pedestrian street, Severe cold region
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment > Bartlett School Env, Energy and Resources
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10087341
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