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ASNC/AHA/ASE/EANM/HFSA/ISA/SCMR/SNMMI expert consensus recommendations for multimodality imaging in cardiac amyloidosis: Part 1 of 2—evidence base and standardized methods of imaging

Dorbala, S; Ando, Y; Bokhari, S; Dispenzieri, A; Falk, RH; Ferrari, VA; Fontana, M; ... Bourque, JM; + view all (2019) ASNC/AHA/ASE/EANM/HFSA/ISA/SCMR/SNMMI expert consensus recommendations for multimodality imaging in cardiac amyloidosis: Part 1 of 2—evidence base and standardized methods of imaging. Journal of Nuclear Cardiology , 26 pp. 2065-2123. 10.1007/s12350-019-01760-6. Green open access

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Cardiac Amyloidosis Consensus Statement - Part 1_Final_JG.pdf - Accepted version

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Abstract

Cardiac amyloidosis is a form of restrictive infiltrative cardiomyopathy that confers significant mortality. Due to the relative rarity of cardiac amyloidosis, clinical and diagnostic expertise in the recognition and evaluation of individuals with suspected amyloidosis is mostly limited to a few expert centers. Electrocardiography, echocardiography, and radionuclide imaging have been used for the evaluation of cardiac amyloidosis for over 40 years.1-3 Although cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has also been in clinical practice for several decades, it was not applied to cardiac amyloidosis until the late 1990s. Despite an abundance of diagnostic imaging options, cardiac amyloidosis remains largely underrecognized or delayed in diagnosis.4 While advanced imaging options for noninvasive evaluation have substantially expanded, the evidence is predominately confined to single-center small studies or limited multicenter larger experiences, and there continues to be no clear consensus on standardized imaging pathways in cardiac amyloidosis. This lack of guidance is particularly problematic given that there are numerous emerging therapeutic options for this morbid disease, increasing the importance of accurate recognition at earlier stages. Imaging provides non-invasive tools for follow-up of disease remission/progression complementing clinical evaluation. Additional areas not defined include appropriate clinical indications for imaging, optimal imaging utilization by clinical presentation, accepted imaging methods, accurate image interpretation, and comprehensive and clear reporting. Prospective randomized clinical trial data for the diagnosis of amyloidosis and for imaging-based strategies for treatment are not available. A consensus of expert opinion is greatly needed to guide the appropriate clinical utilization of imaging in cardiac amyloidosis.

Type: Article
Title: ASNC/AHA/ASE/EANM/HFSA/ISA/SCMR/SNMMI expert consensus recommendations for multimodality imaging in cardiac amyloidosis: Part 1 of 2—evidence base and standardized methods of imaging
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s12350-019-01760-6
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12350-019-01760-6
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inflammation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Clinical Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10086740
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