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Association of Age With Short-term and Long-term Mortality Among Patients Discharged From Intensive Care Units in France

Atramont, A; Lindecker-Cournil, V; Rudant, J; Tajahmady, A; Drewniak, N; Fouard, A; Singer, M; ... Legrand, M; + view all (2019) Association of Age With Short-term and Long-term Mortality Among Patients Discharged From Intensive Care Units in France. JAMA Network Open , 2 (5) , Article e193215. 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.3215. Green open access

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Abstract

Importance: An aging population is increasing the need for intensive care unit (ICU) beds. The benefit of ICU admission for elderly patients remains a subject of debate; however, long-term outcomes across all adult age strata are unknown. Objective: To describe short-term and long-term mortality (up to 3 years after discharge) across age strata in adult patients admitted to French ICUs. Design, Setting, and Participants: Using data extracted from the French national health system database, this cohort study determined in-hospital mortality and mortality at 3 months and 3 years after discharge of adult patients (older than 18 years) admitted to French ICUs from January 1 to December 31, 2013, focusing on age strata. The dates of analysis were November 2017 to December 2018. Exposure: Intensive care unit admission. Main Outcomes and Measures: In-hospital mortality and mortality at 3 months and 3 years after hospital discharge. Results: The study included 133 966 patients (median age, 65 years [interquartile range, 53-76 years); 59.9% male). Total in-hospital mortality was 19.0%, and 3-year mortality was 39.7%. For the 108 539 patients discharged alive from the hospital, 6.8% died by 3 months, and 25.8% died by 3 years after hospital discharge. After adjustment for sex, comorbidities, reason for hospitalization, and organ support (invasive ventilation, noninvasive ventilation, vasopressors, inotropes, fluid resuscitation, blood products administration, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, renal replacement therapy, and mechanical circulatory support), risk of mortality increased progressively across all age strata but with a sharp increase in those 80 years and older. In-hospital and 3-year postdischarge mortality rates, respectively, were 30.5% and 44.9% in patients 80 years and older compared with 16.5% and 22.5% in those younger than 80 years. Total 3-year mortality was 61.4% among patients 80 years and older vs 35.1% in those younger than 80. After age and sex standardization, excess mortality was highest among young patients during their first year after hospital discharge and persisted into the second and third years. In contrast, the mortality risk was close to the general population risk among elderly patients (≥80 years). Age and reason for hospitalization were strongly associated with long-term mortality (9-, 13-, and 20-fold increase in the risk of death 3 years after ICU discharge in patients aged 80-84, 85-89, and ≥90 years, respectively, compared with patients aged <35 years), while organ support use during ICU showed a weaker association (all organ support had 1.3-fold or lower increase in the risk of death). Conclusions and Relevance: Results of this study suggest that aging was associated with an increased risk of mortality in the 3 years after hospital discharge that included an ICU admission, with a sharp increase in those 80 years and older. However, compared with the general population matched by age and sex, excess long-term mortality was high in young surviving patients but not in elderly patients.

Type: Article
Title: Association of Age With Short-term and Long-term Mortality Among Patients Discharged From Intensive Care Units in France
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.3215
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.3215
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the CC-BY License (https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/pages/instructions-for-authors#SecOpenAccess). Copyright © 2019 Atramont A et al. JAMA Network Open.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Experimental and Translational Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10086263
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