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Therapist dilemmas in narrative exposure therapy with clients who have experienced multiple or prolonged trauma: A tape-assisted recall study

Coope, Natalie; (2019) Therapist dilemmas in narrative exposure therapy with clients who have experienced multiple or prolonged trauma: A tape-assisted recall study. Doctoral thesis (D.Clin.Psy), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

The presenting problems of survivors of multiple or prolonged traumatic events, who are experiencing symptoms of PTSD, and have also faced forced migration, may be complicated by a number of factors. These can include the nature or severity of their symptoms and adversities in their current circumstances. This thesis aimed to explore the subjective experiences of therapists working with this client group with a view to better understanding the therapeutic process and its wider impact on those working in the field. Part One is a systematic review and meta-synthesis of the findings of 14 qualitative papers exploring therapist experiences of working with multiple or complex trauma in forced migrant populations. Part Two is a qualitative study examining how therapists negotiated dilemmas in Narrative Exposure Therapy sessions with traumatised refugees or asylum seekers. It used Tape Assisted Recall (TAR) methodology to explore therapists’ moment-by-moment perspectives of specific therapeutic interactions. Part Three is a critical appraisal of the research process in which the researcher’s key observations, challenges and decisions are discussed relating to researcher reflexivity and the TAR procedure.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: D.Clin.Psy
Title: Therapist dilemmas in narrative exposure therapy with clients who have experienced multiple or prolonged trauma: A tape-assisted recall study
Event: UCL (University College London)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2019. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request. - Some third party copyright material has been removed from this e-thesis.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10086225
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