UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Stress, cortisol, and social hierarchy

Sherman, GD; Mehta, PH; (2020) Stress, cortisol, and social hierarchy. Current Opinion in Psychology , 33 pp. 227-232. 10.1016/j.copsyc.2019.09.013. Green open access

[thumbnail of ShermanMehta_StressCortisolHierarchy.pdf]
Preview
Text
ShermanMehta_StressCortisolHierarchy.pdf - Accepted version

Download (189kB) | Preview

Abstract

We review the literature on the relationships between cortisol, stress, and various forms of social status, concluding that cortisol (and stress) is typically elevated when one chronically lacks, or may soon lose, status. Moreover, cortisol is lower when status is higher, as long as that status is stable, enhances one’s sense of control, and does not also substantially increase one’s responsibilities. Because cortisol is both an output (stress indicator) and input (cause of behavioral inhibition), this low cortisol may be both a cause and consequence of stable status. Altogether, the cortisol-status relationship depends not just on one’s status but on what that status means for the individual (e.g. How frequent and severe are stressors? Does one feel a sense of control? Does one need to be vigilant and deferential?).

Type: Article
Title: Stress, cortisol, and social hierarchy
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.copsyc.2019.09.013
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.copsyc.2019.09.013
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: stress; cortisol; status; power; social hierarchy
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Experimental Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10085954
Downloads since deposit
75Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item