UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Globus pallidal deep brain stimulation for Tourette syndrome: Effects on cognitive function

Cappon, D; Beigi, M; Kefalopoulou, Z; Zrinzo, L; Candelario, J; Milabo, C; Akram, H; ... Jahanshahi, M; + view all (2019) Globus pallidal deep brain stimulation for Tourette syndrome: Effects on cognitive function. Parkinsonism & Related Disorders , 69 pp. 14-18. 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2019.10.013.

[img] Text
Foltynie_Globus pallidal deep brain stimulation for Tourette syndrome_AAM.pdf - Accepted version
Access restricted to UCL open access staff until 15 October 2020.

Download (821kB)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: In a double-blind randomized crossover trial, we previously established that bilateral deep brain stimulation of the anteromedial globus pallidus internus (GPiam-DBS) is effective in significantly reducing tic severity in patients with refractory Tourette syndrome (TS). Here, we report the effects of bilateral GPiam-DBS on cognitive function in 11 of the 13 patients who had participated in our double-blind cross-over trial of GPi-DBS. METHODS: Patients were assessed at baseline (4 weeks prior to surgery) and at the end of each of the three-month blinded periods, with stimulation either ON or OFF. The patients were evaluated on tests of memory (California Verbal Learning Test-II (CVLT-II); Corsi blocks; Short Recognition Memory for Faces), executive function (D-KEFS Stroop color-word interference, verbal fluency, Trail-making test, Hayling Sentence Completion test), and attention (Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test, Numbers and Letters Test). RESULTS: GPiam-DBS did not produce any significant change in global cognition. Relative to pre-operative baseline assessment verbal episodic memory on the CVLT-II and set-shifting on the Trail-making Test were improved with DBS OFF. Performance on the cognitive tests were not different with DBS ON versus DBS OFF. GPiam-DBS did not alter aspects of cognition that are impaired in TS such as inhibition on the Stroop interference task or the Hayling Sentence Completion test. CONCLUSIONS: This study extends previous findings providing data showing that GPiam-DBS does not adversely affect cognitive domains such as memory, executive function, verbal fluency, attention, psychomotor speed, and information processing. These results indicate that GPiam-DBS does not produce any cognitive deficits in TS.

Type: Article
Title: Globus pallidal deep brain stimulation for Tourette syndrome: Effects on cognitive function
Location: England
DOI: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2019.10.013
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2019.10.013
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Cognitive function, Deep brain stimulation, Globus pallidus, Tourette syndrome
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10085764
Downloads since deposit
1Download
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item