UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Adjustment strategies amongst black African and black Caribbean men following treatment for prostate cancer: Findings from the Life After Prostate Cancer Diagnosis (LAPCD) study

Wagland, R; Nayoan, J; Matheson, L; Rivas, C; Brett, J; Collaco, N; Alexis, O; ... Watson, E; + view all (2020) Adjustment strategies amongst black African and black Caribbean men following treatment for prostate cancer: Findings from the Life After Prostate Cancer Diagnosis (LAPCD) study. European Journal of Cancer Care , 29 (1) , Article e13183. 10.1111/ecc.13183. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Rivas_EJCC_Manuscipt_Revised_CLEAN.pdf - Accepted version

Download (981kB) | Preview

Abstract

Objective: To explore adjustment strategies adopted by Black African (BA) and Black Caribbean (BC) men in the UK as a response to the impact of PCa diagnosis and treatment effects. / Methods: Men were recruited through the UK‐wide ‘Life After Prostate Cancer Diagnosis' (LAPCD) survey. Telephone interviews were conducted with men (n = 14) with BA and BC backgrounds between 18 and 42 months post‐diagnosis. Data were analysed using a Framework approach. / Results: Most men (n = 12) were born outside the UK, were married (n = 9) and employed (n = 9). Median age was 66 years (range: 55–85). Six overarching themes emerged: a strong reliance upon faith beliefs; maintaining a ‘positive' front; work as distraction; non‐disclosure of diagnosis even amongst family members, influenced by stigma and masculinity concerns; active awareness‐raising amongst a minority and support‐seeking from close community. A few men emphasised a need to ‘pitch' awareness‐raising messages appropriately. Potential links existed between faith beliefs, presenting a positive front, community support‐seeking and local awareness‐raising. / Conclusion: The provision of patient‐centred care requires cultural sensitivity. Interventions that challenge stigma and men's reluctance to disclose problems associated with PCa and treatment may encourage help‐seeking for symptom support. Research is needed to determine how best awareness‐raising messages should be conveyed to black men.

Type: Article
Title: Adjustment strategies amongst black African and black Caribbean men following treatment for prostate cancer: Findings from the Life After Prostate Cancer Diagnosis (LAPCD) study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/ecc.13183
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/ecc.13183
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Black African, Black Caribbean, prostate cancer, psychosocial survivorship
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10085627
Downloads since deposit
11Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item