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Development and Validation of a Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Gene Panel for Children With Neuroinflammation

McCreary, D; Omoyinmi, E; Hong, Y; Mulhern, C; Papadopoulou, C; Casimir, M; Hacohen, Y; ... Eleftheriou, D; + view all (2019) Development and Validation of a Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Gene Panel for Children With Neuroinflammation. JAMA Network Open , 2 (10) , Article e1914274. 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.14274. Green open access

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Abstract

Importance Neuroinflammatory disorders are a range of severe neurological disorders causing brain and spinal inflammation and are now increasingly recognized in the pediatric population. They are often characterized by marked genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity, complicating diagnostic work in clinical practice and molecular diagnosis. Objective To develop and evaluate a next-generation sequencing panel targeting genes causing neuroinflammation or mimicking neuroinflammation. Design, Setting, and Participants Cohort study in which a total of 257 genes associated with monogenic neuroinflammation and/or cerebral vasculopathy, including monogenic noninflammatory diseases mimicking these entities, were selected. A customized enrichment capture array, the neuroinflammation gene panel (NIP), was created. Targeted high-coverage sequencing was applied to DNA samples taken from eligible patients referred to Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, United Kingdom, between January 1, 2017, and January 30, 2019, because of onset of disease early in life, family history, and/or complex neuroinflammatory phenotypes. Main Outcomes and Measures The main outcome was the percentage of individuals with definitive molecular diagnoses, variant classification, and clinical phenotyping of patients with pathogenic variants identified using the NIP panel. The NIP panel was initially validated in 16 patients with known genetic diagnoses. Results The NIP was both sensitive (95%) and specific (100%) for detection of known mutations, including gene deletions, copy number variants, small insertions and deletions, and somatic mosaicism with allele fraction as low as 3%. Prospective testing of 60 patients (30 [50%] male; median [range] age, 9.8 [0.8-20] years) presenting with heterogeneous neuroinflammatory phenotypes revealed at least 1 class 5 (clearly pathogenic) variant in 9 of 60 patients (15%); 18 of 60 patients (30%) had at least 1 class 4 (likely pathogenic) variant. Overall, a definitive molecular diagnosis was established in 12 of 60 patients (20%). Conclusions and Relevance The NIP was associated with molecular diagnosis in this cohort and complemented routine laboratory and radiological workup of patients with neuroinflammation. Unexpected genotype-phenotype associations in patients with pathogenic variants deviating from the classic phenotype were identified. Obtaining an accurate molecular diagnosis in a timely fashion informed patient management, including successful targeted treatment in some instances and early institution of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in others

Type: Article
Title: Development and Validation of a Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Gene Panel for Children With Neuroinflammation
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.14274
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.14274
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the CC-BY License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neuroinflammation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inflammation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10085139
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