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Genetic and phenotypic characterisation of inherited myopathies in a tertiary neuromuscular centre

Bugiardini, E; Khan, A; Phadke, R; Lynch, DS; Cortese, A; Feng, L; Gang, Q; ... Hanna, MG; + view all (2019) Genetic and phenotypic characterisation of inherited myopathies in a tertiary neuromuscular centre. Neuromuscular Disorders , 29 (10) pp. 747-757. 10.1016/j.nmd.2019.08.003. (In press).

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Abstract

Diagnosis of inherited myopathies can be a challenging and lengthy process due to broad genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. In this study we applied focused exome sequencing to investigate a cohort of 100 complex adult myopathy cases who remained undiagnosed despite extensive investigation. We evaluated the frequency of genetic diagnoses, clinical and pathological factors most likely to be associated with a positive diagnosis, clinical pitfalls and new phenotypic insights that could help to guide future clinical practice. We identified pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants in 32/100 cases. TTN-related myopathy was the most common diagnosis (4/32 cases) but the majority of positive diagnoses related to a single gene each. Childhood onset of symptoms was more likely to be associated with a positive diagnosis. Atypical and new clinico-pathological phenotypes with diagnostic pitfalls were identified. These include the new emerging group of neuromyopathy genes (HSPB1, BICD2) and atypical biopsy findings: COL6A-related myopathy with mitochondrial features, DOK7 presenting as myopathy with minicores and DES-related myopathy without myofibrillar pathology. Our data demonstrates the diagnostic efficacy of broad NGS screening when combined with detailed clinico-pathological phenotyping in a complex neuromuscular cohort. Atypical clinico-pathological features may delay the diagnostic process if smaller targeted gene panels are used.

Type: Article
Title: Genetic and phenotypic characterisation of inherited myopathies in a tertiary neuromuscular centre
Location: Snowbird, UT
DOI: 10.1016/j.nmd.2019.08.003
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nmd.2019.08.003
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Clinical Neurology, Neurosciences, Neurosciences & Neurology
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10084679
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