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Developing quality fidelity and engagement measures for complex health interventions

Walton, H; Spector, A; Williamson, M; Tombor, I; Michie, S; (2019) Developing quality fidelity and engagement measures for complex health interventions. British Journal of Health Psychology 10.1111/bjhp.12394. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Objectives: To understand whether interventions are effective, we need to know whether the interventions are delivered as planned (with fidelity) and engaged with. To measure fidelity and engagement effectively, high‐quality measures are needed. We outline a five‐step method which can be used to develop quality measures of fidelity and engagement for complex health interventions. We provide examples from a fidelity study conducted within an evaluation of an intervention aimed to increase independence in dementia. // Methods: We propose five steps that can be systematically used to develop fidelity checklists for researchers, providers, and participants to measure fidelity and engagement. These steps include the following: (1) reviewing previous measures, (2) analysing intervention components and developing a framework outlining the content of the intervention, (3) developing fidelity checklists and coding guidelines, (4) obtaining feedback about the content and wording of checklists and guidelines, and (5) piloting and refining checklists and coding guidelines to assess and improve reliability. // Results: Three fidelity checklists that can be used reliably were developed to measure fidelity of and engagement with, the Promoting Independence in Dementia (PRIDE) intervention. As these measures were designed to be used by researchers, providers, and participants, we developed two versions of the checklists: one for participants and one for researchers and providers. // Conclusions: The five steps that we propose can be used to develop psychometrically robust and implementable measures of fidelity and engagement for complex health interventions that can be used by different target audiences. By considering quality when developing measures, we can be more confident in the interpretation of intervention outcomes drawn from fidelity and engagement studies.

Type: Article
Title: Developing quality fidelity and engagement measures for complex health interventions
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/bjhp.12394
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12394
Language: English
Additional information: © 2019 The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Applied Health Research
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10084083
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