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Enhanced flow-motion complexity of skin microvascular perfusion in Sherpas and lowlanders during ascent to high altitude

Carey, D; Thanaj, M; Davies, T; Gilbert-Kawai, E; Mitchell, K; Levett, DZH; Mythen, MG; ... Clough, GF; + view all (2019) Enhanced flow-motion complexity of skin microvascular perfusion in Sherpas and lowlanders during ascent to high altitude. Scientific Reports , 9 , Article 14391. 10.1038/s41598-019-50774-0. Green open access

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Abstract

An increased and more effective microvascular perfusion is postulated to play a key role in the physiological adaptation of Sherpa highlanders to the hypobaric hypoxia encountered at high altitude. To investigate this, we used Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC) analysis to explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of the variability of the skin microvascular blood flux (BF) signals measured at the forearm and finger, in 32 lowlanders (LL) and 46 Sherpa highlanders (SH) during the Xtreme Everest 2 expedition. Measurements were made at baseline (BL) (LL: London 35 m; SH: Kathmandu 1300 m) and at Everest base camp (LL and SH: EBC 5,300 m). We found that BF signal content increased with ascent to EBC in both SH and LL. At both altitudes, LZC of the BF signals was significantly higher in SH, and was related to local slow-wave flow-motion activity over multiple spatial and temporal scales. In SH, BF LZC was also positively associated with LZC of the simultaneously measured tissue oxygenation signals. These data provide robust mechanistic information of microvascular network functionality and flexibility during hypoxic exposure on ascent to high altitude. They demonstrate the importance of a sustained heterogeneity of network perfusion, associated with local vaso-control mechanisms, to effective tissue oxygenation during hypobaric hypoxia.

Type: Article
Title: Enhanced flow-motion complexity of skin microvascular perfusion in Sherpas and lowlanders during ascent to high altitude
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-50774-0
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-50774-0
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10084035
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