UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Estimates for quality of life loss due to Respiratory Syncytial Virus

Hodgson, D; Atkins, KE; Baguelin, M; Panovska-Griffiths, J; Thorrington, D; van Hoek, AJ; Zhao, H; ... Pebody, R; + view all (2019) Estimates for quality of life loss due to Respiratory Syncytial Virus. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 10.1111/irv.12686. (In press). Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Hodgson_et_al-2019-Influenza_and_Other_Respiratory_Viruses.pdf - Published version

Download (564kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background In children aged <5 years in whom severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) episodes predominantly occur, there are currently no appropriate standardised instruments to estimate quality of life years (QALY) loss. Objectives We estimated the age‐specific QALY loss due to RSV by developing a regression model which predicts the QALY loss without the use of standardised instruments. Methods We conducted a surveillance study which targeted confirmed RSV episodes in children aged <5 years (confirmed cases) and their household members who experienced symptoms of RSV during the same time (suspected cases). All participants were asked to complete questions regarding their health during the infection, with the suspected cases additionally providing health‐related quality of life (HR‐QoL) loss estimates by completing EQ‐5D‐3L‐Y or EQ‐5D‐3L instruments. We used the responses from the suspected cases to calibrate a regression model which estimates the HR‐QoL and QALY loss due to infection. Findings For confirmed RSV cases in children under 5 years of age who sought health care, our model predicted a QALY loss per RSV episode of 3.823 × 10−3 (95% CI 0.492‐12.766 × 10−3), compared with 3.024 × 10−3 (95% CI 0.329‐10.098 × 10−3) for under fives who did not seek health care. Quality of life years loss per episode was less for older children and adults, estimated as 1.950 × 10−3 (0.185‐9.578 × 10−3) and 1.543 × 10−3 (0.136‐6.406 × 10−3) for those who seek or do not seek health care, respectively. Conclusion Evaluations of potential RSV vaccination programmes should consider their impact across the whole population, not just young child children.

Type: Article
Title: Estimates for quality of life loss due to Respiratory Syncytial Virus
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/irv.12686
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/irv.12686
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: EQ-5D, cost-effectiveness, health-related quality of life, human respiratory syncytial virus, quality-adjusted life years, respiratory disease
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Applied Health Research
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics > Infectious Disease Informatics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10084011
Downloads since deposit
4Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item