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The self–other distinction in psychopathology: Recent developments from a mentalizing perspective

Luyten, P; De Meulemeester, C; Fonagy, P; (2020) The self–other distinction in psychopathology: Recent developments from a mentalizing perspective. In: Ochsner, K and Gilead, M, (eds.) The Neural Bases of Mentalizing. Springer (In press).

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Abstract

The mentalizing approach to the development and treatment of psychopathology has gained momentum in recent years. Mentalizing (or reflective functioning) refers to the human capacity to understand oneself and others in terms of internal mental states, and plays a key role in our capacity to navigate our complex and essentially interpersonal world. Temporary or chronic impairments in mentalizing have been identified in a wide array of psychiatric disorder, with different types of mental disorder being associated with different types of imbalances between various dimensions of mentalizing. Borderline personality disorder (BPD), for instance, is characterized by the rapid loss of controlled mentalizing in high-arousal contexts, leading to overreliance on fast, automatic, and biased mentalizing. As a result, these individuals show a tendency to conflate the mental states of self and others (also known as identify diffusion). Here, we summarize our emerging knowledge concerning the neural circuits underlying the self–other distinction, with a focus on impairments in self-other distinction in BPD. Implications for both basic research and intervention research are discussed.

Type: Book chapter
Title: The self–other distinction in psychopathology: Recent developments from a mentalizing perspective
Publisher version: https://www.springer.com/gp/climate/featured-books...
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10083868
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