UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Comparing the effects of Intermittent Fasting and Continuous Calorie Restriction on eating disorder and mood symptoms in healthy dieters

Donaldson, Freya; (2019) Comparing the effects of Intermittent Fasting and Continuous Calorie Restriction on eating disorder and mood symptoms in healthy dieters. Doctoral thesis (D.Clin.Psy), UCL (University College London). Green open access

[thumbnail of Donaldson_10083605_Thesis_sig-removed.pdf]
Preview
Text
Donaldson_10083605_Thesis_sig-removed.pdf

Download (5MB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Overweight and obesity is currently a worldwide problem. Calorie restriction (CR) diets, including intermittent fasting (IF) and continuous calorie restriction (CCR), are popular methods of attempting to lose weight and improve health outcomes. Although research has provided inconsistent results, the eating disorder (ED) field are concerned that CR may lead to adverse psychological outcomes, such as disordered eating symptomology. Few studies have explored the psychological and behavioural effects of IF and whether it differs from the effects of CCR. Aims: To compare the effects of beginning the ‘5:2 diet’, a popular IF regime, with beginning a CCR diet on ED symptoms, binge-eating, food cravings and mood. Method: Males and females participating in either IF (500 calories for females, 650 calories for males 2 days/ week) or CCR (15-25% calorie restriction for 7 days/week) were followed for four weeks. ED symptoms, binge-eating, food cravings, and mood were assessed using online self-report measures prior to starting the diets and after four weeks of dieting (N=86). Participant adherence to the diets was measured through food diaries and weight lost. Results: Participants in both diet groups reported reductions in shape concern, weight concern, binge-eating disorder symptoms, food craving and mood symptoms over the four weeks of dieting. The IF group reported greater reductions in shape and weight concern than the CCR group, and lower levels of eating concern after four weeks of dieting compared to the CCR group. Both groups reported increased restraint scores over the four weeks of dieting, and this was significantly higher for the CCR group. Exploration of risk factors demonstrated those who scored highly on dichotomous thinking experienced less reduction of food cravings for the IF group, whereas those who scored low on self-esteem experienced a higher reduction of mood symptoms for the CCR group. Conclusions: Commencing an IF or CCR diet was associated with an increase in restraint and a reduction in numerous symptoms of eating disorders, food craving and adverse mood symptoms in healthy adults. Overall, commencing an IF diet was associated with greater reductions in symptoms of eating disorders.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: D.Clin.Psy
Title: Comparing the effects of Intermittent Fasting and Continuous Calorie Restriction on eating disorder and mood symptoms in healthy dieters
Event: UCL (University College London)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2019. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10083605
Downloads since deposit
121Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item