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Incidence of mild cognitive impairment in World Trade Center responders: Long-term consequences of re-experiencing the events on 9/11/2001

Clouston, SAP; Diminich, ED; Kotov, R; Pietrzak, RH; Richards, M; Spiro, A; Deri, Y; ... Luft, BJ; + view all (2019) Incidence of mild cognitive impairment in World Trade Center responders: Long-term consequences of re-experiencing the events on 9/11/2001. Alzheimer's and Dementia , 11 pp. 628-636. 10.1016/j.dadm.2019.07.006. Green open access

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Abstract

Objective: This study examined whether World Trade Center (WTC) exposures and chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were associated with incidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in a longitudinal analysis of a prospective cohort study of WTC responders. Methods: Incidence of MCI was assessed in a clinical sample of WTC responders (N = 1800) who were cognitively intact at baseline assessment. Crude incidence rates were calculated and compared to population estimates using standardized incidence ratios. Multivariable analyses used Cox proportional-hazards regression. Results: Responders were 53.1 years old (SD = 7.9) at baseline. Among eligible cognitively intact responders, 255 (14.2%) developed MCI at follow-up. Incidence of MCI was higher than expected based on expectations from prior published research. Incidence was higher among those with increased PTSD symptom severity, and prolonged exposure was a risk factor in apolipoprotein-ε4 carriers. Conclusions: PTSD and prolonged WTC exposures were associated with increased incidence of MCI in WTC responders, results that may portend future high rates of dementia in WTC-exposed responders.

Type: Article
Title: Incidence of mild cognitive impairment in World Trade Center responders: Long-term consequences of re-experiencing the events on 9/11/2001
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.dadm.2019.07.006
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.dadm.2019.07.006
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the Alzheimer’s Association. This is an open access article under the CC BY license(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Mild cognitive impairment, Posttraumatic stress, World Trade Center disaster
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10083251
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