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Dopaminergic Modulation of Sensory Attenuation in Parkinson's Disease: Is There an Underlying Modulation of Beta Power?

Macerollo, A; Limousin, P; Korlipara, P; Foltynie, T; Edwards, MJ; Kilner, J; (2019) Dopaminergic Modulation of Sensory Attenuation in Parkinson's Disease: Is There an Underlying Modulation of Beta Power? Frontiers in Neurology , 10 , Article 1001. 10.3389/fneur.2019.01001. Green open access

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Abstract

Background and Aims: Pathological high amplitude of beta oscillations is thought as the underlying mechanism of motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD), in particular with regard to bradykinesia. In addition, abnormality in a neurophysiological phenomenon labeled sensory attenuation has been found in patients with PD. The current study explored the hypothesis that the abnormal sensory attenuation has a causal link with the typical abnormality in beta oscillations in PD. Methods: The study tested sixteen right-handed patients with a diagnosis of PD and 22 healthy participants, which were matched by age and gender. Somatosensory evoked potentials were elicited through electrical stimulation of the median nerve at the wrist. Electrical activity was recorded at the scalp using a 128 channels EEG. Somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded in 2 conditions: at rest and at the onset of a voluntary movement, which was a self-paced abduction movement of the right thumb. Results: Healthy participants showed a reduction of the N20-P25 amplitude at the onset of the right thumb abduction compared to the rest condition (P < 0.05). When patients were OFF medication, they showed mild reduction of the N20-P25 component at movement onset (P < 0.05). On the contrary, they did show greater attenuation of the N20-P25 component at the onset ofmovement compared to the rest condition when ON medication (P < 0.05). There was no significant evidence of a link between the degree of sensory attenuation and the change in beta oscillations in our cohort of patients. Conclusion: These results confirmed a significant link between dopaminergic modulation and sensory attenuation. However, the sensory attenuation and beta oscillations were found as two independent phenomena.

Type: Article
Title: Dopaminergic Modulation of Sensory Attenuation in Parkinson's Disease: Is There an Underlying Modulation of Beta Power?
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2019.01001
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2019.01001
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Clinical Neurology, Neurosciences, Neurosciences & Neurology, Parkinson's disease, sensory attenuation, beta power, bradykinesia, motor symptoms, SOMATOSENSORY-EVOKED-POTENTIALS, FREQUENCY STIMULATION, SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS, ACTIVE INFERENCE, MOVEMENT, OSCILLATIONS, SUPPRESSION, REDUCTION, FRAMEWORK, CORTEX
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10083047
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