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Remapping in cerebral and cerebellar cortices is not restricted by somatotopy

Hahamy, A; Makin, T; (2019) Remapping in cerebral and cerebellar cortices is not restricted by somatotopy. The Journal of Neuroscience 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2599-18.2019. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

A fundamental organizing principle in the somatosensory and motor systems is somatotopy, where specific body parts are represented separately and adjacently to other body parts, resulting in a body map. Different terminals of the sensorimotor network show varied somatotopic layouts, in which the relative position, distance and overlap between body-part representations differ. Since somatotopy is best characterized in the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices, these terminals have been the main focus of research on somatotopic remapping following loss of sensory input (e.g. arm amputation). Cortical remapping is generally considered to be driven by the layout of the underlying somatotopy, such that neighboring body-part representations tend to activate the deprived brain region. Here, we challenge the assumption that somatotopic layout restricts remapping, by comparing patterns of remapping in humans born without one hand (hereafter, one-handers, n=26) across multiple terminals of the sensorimotor pathway. We first report that in the cerebellum of one-handers, the deprived hand region represents multiple body parts. Importantly, the representations of some of these body parts do not neighbor the deprived hand region. We further replicate our previous finding, showing a similar pattern of remapping in the deprived hand region of the cerebral cortex in one-handers. Finally, we report preliminary results of a similar remapping pattern in the putamen of one-handers. Since these three sensorimotor terminals (cerebellum, cerebrum, putamen) contain different somatotopic layouts, the parallel remapping they undergo demonstrates that the mere spatial layout of body-part representations may not exclusively dictate remapping in the sensorimotor systems.

Type: Article
Title: Remapping in cerebral and cerebellar cortices is not restricted by somatotopy
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2599-18.2019
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2599-18.2019
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2019 Hahamy and Makin. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided that the original work is properly attributed.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10082906
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