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Fetal surgery for open spina bifida

Sacco, A; Ushakov, F; Thompson, D; Peebles, D; Pandya, P; De Coppi, P; Wimalasundera, R; ... Deprest, J; + view all (2019) Fetal surgery for open spina bifida. [Review]. The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist , 21 (4) pp. 271-282. 10.1111/tog.12603. Green open access

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Abstract

Key content: Spina bifida is a congenital neurological condition with lifelong physical and mental effects. Open fetal repair of the spinal lesion has been shown to improve hindbrain herniation, ventriculoperitoneal shunting, independent mobility and bladder outcomes for the child and, despite an increased risk of prematurity, does not seem to increase the risk of neurodevelopmental impairment. Open fetal surgery is associated with maternal morbidity. Surgery at our institution is offered and performed according to internationally agreed criteria and protocols. Further evidence regarding long‐term outcomes, fetoscopic repair and alternative techniques is awaited. Learning objectives: To understand the clinical effects, potential prevention and prenatal diagnosis of spina bifida. To understand the rationale and evidence supporting the benefits and risks of fetal repair of open spina bifida. To understand the criteria defining those who are likely to benefit from fetal surgery. Ethical issues: The concept of the fetus as a patient, and issues surrounding fetal death or the need for resuscitation during fetal surgery. The associated maternal morbidity in a procedure performed solely for the benefit of the fetus/child. The financial implications of new surgical treatments.

Type: Article
Title: Fetal surgery for open spina bifida
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/tog.12603
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/tog.12603
Language: English
Additional information: © 2019 The Authors. The Obstetrician and Gynaecologist published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health > Maternal and Fetal Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Neurosciences Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10082813
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