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Is the use of e-cigarettes for smoking cessation associated with alcohol consumption? A population-level survey of successful quitters in England

Jackson, S; Beard, E; Michie, S; West, R; Brown, J; (2020) Is the use of e-cigarettes for smoking cessation associated with alcohol consumption? A population-level survey of successful quitters in England. Addictive Behaviors , 101 , Article 106138. 10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106138.

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Abstract

Objective: To examine associations between the use of e-cigarettes for smoking cessation and levels of alcohol consumption, high-risk drinking, and attempts to cut down alcohol consumption compared with use of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) or no aid. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of adults (≥16 years) in England. The sample included a total of 961 people who had quit smoking with the use of either e-cigarettes (n = 425), NRT (n = 116), or no aid (n = 421) within the past year and were still abstinent at the survey. Drinking behaviour was assessed with the AUDIT. Results: Mean (SD) alcohol consumption among those who quit smoking with e-cigarettes, NRT, and no aid was 7.78 (13.41), 7.12 (13.85), and 5.55 (8.70) units/week, respectively. The prevalence of high-risk drinking was 43.3% (n = 184), 32.2% (n = 37), and 36.8% (n = 155), respectively. Among high-risk drinkers, the prevalence of attempts to cut down alcohol consumption was 22.3% (n = 41), 18.9% (n = 7), and 27.7% (n = 43), respectively. After adjustment for covariates, those who quit with e-cigarettes had significantly higher alcohol consumption than those who quit unaided (B = 1.69, 95%CI 0.21–3.17), but there was no significant difference relative to those who quit with NRT. Differences in high-risk drinking and attempts to cut down were not significant, but Bayes factors indicated the data were insensitive (range: 0.47–0.95). Conclusions: Recent ex-smokers who used e-cigarettes to help them quit consumed around two more units of alcohol each week than those who quit unaided, but their alcohol consumption was similar to those who quit with NRT. Data on differences in high-risk drinking and attempts to cut down alcohol consumption among high-risk drinkers were inconclusive.

Type: Article
Title: Is the use of e-cigarettes for smoking cessation associated with alcohol consumption? A population-level survey of successful quitters in England
DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106138
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106138
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: E-cigarettes, Vaping, Alcohol, Drinking, Smoking cessation
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10082811
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