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Associations between objectively assessed and questionnaire-based sedentary behaviour with body mass index and systolic blood pressure in Kuwaiti adolescents

Hashem, R; Rey-Lόpez, JP; Hamer, M; McMunn, A; Rowlands, A; Whincup, PH; Owen, CG; ... Stamatakis, E; + view all (2019) Associations between objectively assessed and questionnaire-based sedentary behaviour with body mass index and systolic blood pressure in Kuwaiti adolescents. BMC Research Notes , 12 , Article 588. 10.1186/s13104-019-4626-0. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Kuwait has one of the highest obesity rates in the world. This study examined the associations between sedentary behaviour (objectively measured and self-reported), adiposity and systolic blood pressure in a sample of adolescents residing in Kuwait. Data was obtained from the Study of Health and Activity among adolescents in Kuwait (2012-2013). The sample included a total of 435 adolescents (201 boys). Outcomes were age- and sex specific body mass index Z-scores and systolic blood pressure. Exposures were total sedentary behaviour measured by accelerometry and time spent in some sedentary behaviours (television viewing, video games, computer use and total screen-time). We used multiple linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, governorate, maternal education and physical activity, to examine associations between sedentary behaviour and adiposity and systolic blood pressure. RESULTS: Only 2 statistically significant associations were found between sedentary behaviour and the study outcomes: body mass in boys was directly associated with higher sedentary time [β (95% CIs) 0.003 (0.00 to 0.06)]; body mass index was inversely associated with videogames in both sexes [girls: β (95% CIs) - 0.17 (- 0.48 to - 0.04); boys: - 0.24 (- 0.57 to - 0.12)]. In this sample of Kuwaiti adolescents, sedentary behaviour showed limited deleterious associations with adiposity and systolic blood pressure.

Type: Article
Title: Associations between objectively assessed and questionnaire-based sedentary behaviour with body mass index and systolic blood pressure in Kuwaiti adolescents
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s13104-019-4626-0
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13104-019-4626-0
Language: English
Additional information: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: Accelerometry, Adiposity, Blood pressure, Body mass index, Sedentary behavior
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10082496
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