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Compatibility between agendas for improving human development and wildlife conservation outside protected areas: Insights from 20 years of data

Ament, JM; Collen, B; Carbone, C; Mace, GM; Freeman, R; (2019) Compatibility between agendas for improving human development and wildlife conservation outside protected areas: Insights from 20 years of data. People and Nature , 1 (3) pp. 305-316. 10.1002/pan3.10041. Green open access

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Abstract

The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) include economic, social and environmental dimensions of human development and make explicit commitments to all of life on Earth. Evidence of continuing global biodiversity loss has, at the same time, led to a succession of internationally agreed conservation targets. With multiple targets (even within one policy realm, e.g. the CBD Aichi Targets for biodiversity), it is possible for different indicators to respond in the same direction, in opposite directions or to show no particular relationship. When considering the different sectors of the SDGs, there are many possible relationships among indicators that have been widely discussed, but rarely analysed in detail. Here, we present a comparative cross‐national analysis exploring temporally integrated linkages between human development indicators and wildlife conservation trends. The results suggest that in lower income countries there are negative relationships between measures of human population growth and bird and mammal population abundance trends outside protected areas. The results also suggest a positive relationship between economic growth and wildlife population trends in lower income countries. We stress, however, the need for future research to further explore the relationships between economic growth and natural resource‐based imports. Our results highlight a clear potential for compatibility of the conservation and development agendas and support the need for further integration among sustainable development strategies.

Type: Article
Title: Compatibility between agendas for improving human development and wildlife conservation outside protected areas: Insights from 20 years of data
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/pan3.10041
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/pan3.10041
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Economic growth, gross domestic product, human development, human population density, Sustainable Development Goals, wildlife conservation, wildlife population, abundance trends
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Genetics, Evolution and Environment
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10082068
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