UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Nosocomial transmission of influenza: a retrospective cross-sectional study using next generation sequencing at a hospital in England (2012-2014)

Blackburn, R; Frampton, D; Smith, C; Fragaszy, E; Watson, S; Ferns, R; Binter, S; ... Hayward, A; + view all (2019) Nosocomial transmission of influenza: a retrospective cross-sectional study using next generation sequencing at a hospital in England (2012-2014). Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses , 13 (6) pp. 556-563. 10.1111/irv.12679. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Blackburn_Nosocomial transmission of influenza A retrospective cross-sectional study using next generation sequencing at a hospital in.pdf - Published version

Download (559kB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND The extent of transmission of influenza in hospital settings is poorly understood. Next generation sequencing may improve this by providing information on the genetic relatedness of viral strains. OBJECTIVES We aimed to apply next generation sequencing to describe transmission in hospital and compare with methods based on routinely‐collected data. METHODS All influenza samples taken through routine care from patients at University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (September 2012 to March 2014) were included. We conducted Illumina sequencing and identified genetic clusters. We compared nosocomial transmission estimates defined using classical methods (based on time from admission to sample) and genetic clustering. We identified pairs of cases with space‐time links and assessed genetic relatedness. RESULTS We sequenced influenza sampled from 214 patients. There were 180 unique genetic strains, 16 (8.8%) of which seeded a new transmission chain. Nosocomial transmission was indicated for 32 (15.0%) cases using the classical definition and 34 (15.8%) based on genetic clustering. Of the 50 patients in a genetic cluster, 11 (22.0%) had known space‐time links with other cases in the same cluster. Genetic distances between pairs of cases with space‐time links were lower than for pairs without spatial links (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS Genetic data confirmed that nosocomial transmission contributes significantly to the hospital burden of influenza and elucidated transmission chains. Prospective next generation sequencing could support outbreak investigations and monitor the impact of infection and control measures.

Type: Article
Title: Nosocomial transmission of influenza: a retrospective cross-sectional study using next generation sequencing at a hospital in England (2012-2014)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/irv.12679
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/irv.12679
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Cross infection, disease outbreaks, influenza, human, molecular epidemiology
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics > Infectious Disease Informatics
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10081242
Downloads since deposit
11Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item