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Role theory of schools and adolescent health

Bonell, C; Blakemore, S-J; Fletcher, A; Patton, G; (2019) Role theory of schools and adolescent health. The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health , 3 (10) pp. 742-748. 10.1016/S2352-4642(19)30183-X. Green open access

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Abstract

Evidence that health and education are interlinked is transforming investment in adolescent health. However, no comprehensive theory of how schools influence mental and physical health, which could guide, and be tested through, empirical studies, exists. Using neuroscience, sociology, and other disciplines, we theorise that schools catering for students age 11-18 years can influence health by affecting the behavioural roles that are available for students to perform, the resources available to influence student behaviour, and how peers and teachers (known as the audience) respond. Some schools offer opportunities for students to adopt diverse pro-school roles and to maintain these roles via constructive feedback. Other schools focus narrowly on high academic attainment. Where pro-school roles are unavailable, are beyond students' resources, or elicit negative responses from teachers and peers, students might experience anxiety and choose to adopt anti-school roles, particularly in later adolescence. Behaviours that harm health, such as violence and drug use, are central to anti-school roles because they can facilitate belonging and status within anti-school peer groups and symbolise alternative transitions to adulthood.

Type: Article
Title: Role theory of schools and adolescent health
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/S2352-4642(19)30183-X
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/S2352-4642(19)30183-X
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10080971
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