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Sacrilege, Tractarian Fiction and the Very Long Reformation

Shell, A; (2019) Sacrilege, Tractarian Fiction and the Very Long Reformation. Reformation , 24 (2) pp. 195-209. 10.1080/13574175.2019.1665285. Green open access

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Abstract

The Tractarian movement in the nineteenth-century Church of England brought new life to Reformation-era issues. One such was the notion of sacrilege, especially associated with Catholics and high-churchmen. Responding to reformist destruction of religious houses and the lay impropriation of monastic lands and revenues, believers in sacrilege asserted that those who damaged sacred objects or stole from the church risked divine displeasure. The seventeenth-century commentator Henry Spelman’s writings on sacrilege were reprinted in the nineteenth century, and his warning that the descendants of impropriators would suffer for the sins of their ancestors was widely embraced. This essay examines how two Tractarian writers, John Mason Neale (1816–66) and Charlotte M. Yonge (1823–1901), engaged with ideas of sacrilege in their fiction.

Type: Article
Title: Sacrilege, Tractarian Fiction and the Very Long Reformation
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/13574175.2019.1665285
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/13574175.2019.1665285
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Sacrilege, Sir Henry Spelman, John Mason Neale, Charlotte M. Yonge, dissolution of the monasteries, Gothic novel
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of Arts and Humanities
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of Arts and Humanities > Dept of English Lang and Literature
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10080666
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