UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Predictors of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Strokes Among People Living With HIV: The D:A:D International Prospective Multicohort Study

Hatleberg, CI; Ryom, L; Kamara, D; De Wit, S; Law, M; Phillips, A; Reiss, P; ... Sabin, C; + view all (2019) Predictors of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Strokes Among People Living With HIV: The D:A:D International Prospective Multicohort Study. EClinicalMedicine 10.1016/j.eclinm.2019.07.008. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
1-s2.0-S2589537019301233-main.pdf - Published version

Download (682kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Hypertension is a stronger predictor of hemorrhagic than ischemic strokes in the general population. We aimed to identify whether hypertension or other risk factors, including HIV-related factors, differ in their associations with stroke subtypes in people living with HIV (PLWHIV). Methods: HIV-1-positive individuals from the Data collection on Adverse events of anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study were followed from the time of first blood pressure (BP) measurement after 1/1/1999 or study entry until the first of a validated stroke, 6 months after last follow-up or 1/2/2014. Stroke events were centrally validated using standardized criteria. Hypertension was defined as one systolic BP ≥ 140 mm Hg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mm Hg. Poisson and Cox proportional hazards regression models determined associations of established cerebro/cardiovascular disease and HIV-related risk factors with stroke and tested whether these differed by stroke subtype. Findings: 590 strokes (83 hemorrhagic, 296 ischemic, 211 unknown) occurred over 339,979 person-years (PYRS) (incidence rate/1000 PYRS 1.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.60–1.88]). Common predictors of both hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes were hypertension (relative hazard 3.55 [95% CI 2.29–5.50] and 2.24 [1.77–2.84] respectively) and older age (1.28 [1.17–1.39] and 1.19 [1.12–1.25]). Male gender (1.62 [1.14–2.31] and 0.60 [0.35–0.91]), previous cardiovascular events (4.03 [2.91–5.57] and 1.44 [0.66–3.16]) and smoking (1.90 [1.41–2.56] and 1.08 [0.68–1.71]) were stronger predictors of ischemic then hemorrhagic strokes, whereas hypertension, hepatitis C (1.32 [0.72–2.40] and 0.46 [0.30–0.70]) and estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.72 m3 (4.80 [2.47–9.36] and 1.04 [0.67–1.60]) were stronger predictors of hemorrhagic than ischemic strokes. A CD4 count < 200 cells/μL was associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke only. Interpretation: Risk factors for stroke may differ by subtype in PLWHIV, emphasizing the importance of further research to increase the precision of stroke risk estimation.

Type: Article
Title: Predictors of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Strokes Among People Living With HIV: The D:A:D International Prospective Multicohort Study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.eclinm.2019.07.008
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eclinm.2019.07.008
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Keywords: HIV, Cerebrovascular disease, Stroke, Ischemic stroke, Hemorrhagic stroke, Stratified risk prediction, Risk factors
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10080068
Downloads since deposit
21Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item