UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Variation in the perioperative care of women undergoing abdominal-based microvascular breast reconstruction in the United Kingdom (The optiFLAPP Study)

Gardiner, MD; Giblin, V; Highton, D; Jain, A; Jeevan, R; Jhanji, S; Kwasnicki, RM; ... Way, B; + view all (2019) Variation in the perioperative care of women undergoing abdominal-based microvascular breast reconstruction in the United Kingdom (The optiFLAPP Study). Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery , 72 (1) pp. 35-42. 10.1016/j.bjps.2018.08.007. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text (Article)
Patel Variation in the perioperative care of women undergoing abdominal-based microvascular breast reconstruction in the United Kingdom (The optiFLAPP Study).pdf - Accepted version

Download (726kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text (Table)
Patel JPRAS optiFLAPP tables v3.pdf - Accepted version

Download (356kB) | Preview

Abstract

Introduction Abdominal-based microvascular breast reconstruction constitutes approximately one-fifth of reconstructions following mastectomy for breast cancer. Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols have been implemented to improve patient care. The aim of this project was to identify variation in the perioperative care of women undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction to inform development of an ERAS protocol. Methods Surveys were developed for plastic surgeons, anaesthetists and the lead clinician for breast reconstruction at each unit. These assessed most aspects of perioperative care. A team of medical student collaborators was identified. This team created a list of surgeons and anaesthetists in the United Kingdom by unit. REDCap was used to record their responses. Results Nineteen (19/39, 49%) lead clinicians, 83 (83/134, 62%) plastic surgeons and 71 (71/100, 71%) anaesthetists from units across the UK completed the surveys. Marked variation was identified in the clinician responses when compared with the national and international guidelines. This variation covered many aspects of patient care including antibiotic and fluid prescribing, surgical technique, post-operative care and recording of patient outcomes. Conclusions The optiFLAPP national practice survey has demonstrated variation in the perioperative care of women undergoing abdominal-based microvascular breast reconstruction. We propose a large prospective audit to assess current protocols and support development of randomised controlled trials.

Type: Article
Title: Variation in the perioperative care of women undergoing abdominal-based microvascular breast reconstruction in the United Kingdom (The optiFLAPP Study)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.bjps.2018.08.007
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjps.2018.08.007
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: breast reconstruction, microsurgery, perioperative, deep inferior epigastric perforator flap
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10079565
Downloads since deposit
173Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item