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Antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and potential synthetic treatments

Ali, J; Rafiq, QA; Ratcliffe, E; (2018) Antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and potential synthetic treatments. Future Science OA , 4 (4) , Article FSO290. 10.4155/fsoa-2017-0109. Green open access

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Abstract

Since the discovery of antibiotics by Sir Alexander Fleming they have been used throughout medicine and play a vital role in combating microorganisms. However, with their vast use, development of resistance has become more prevalent and their use is currently under threat. Antibiotic resistance poses a global threat to human and animal health, with many bacterial species having developed some form of resistance and in some cases within a year of first exposure to antimicrobial agents. This review aims to examine some of the mechanisms behind resistance. Additionally, re-engineering organisms, re-sensitizing bacteria to antibiotics and gene-editing techniques such as the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-Cas9 system are providing novel approaches to combat bacterial resistance. To that extent, we have reviewed some of these novel and innovative technologies.

Type: Article
Title: Antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and potential synthetic treatments
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.4155/fsoa-2017-0109
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.4155/fsoa-2017-0109
Language: English
Additional information: © 2019 Future Science Group. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. To view a copy of this license, visit (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: antibiotics, antimicrobial resistance, infectious agents, molecular biology, re-sensitizing, resistance mechanisms
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Biochemical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10079373
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