UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Longitudinal associations between diurnal cortisol variation and later life cognitive impairment

Tsui, A; Richards, M; Singh-Manoux, A; Udeh-Momoh, C; Davis, D; (2020) Longitudinal associations between diurnal cortisol variation and later life cognitive impairment. Neurology , 94 (2) e133-e141. 10.1212/WNL.0000000000008729. Green open access

[thumbnail of Davis_e133.full.pdf]
Preview
Text
Davis_e133.full.pdf - Published Version

Download (300kB) | Preview

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether HPAA dysfunction is prospectively associated with global cognitive impairment in later life Methods: This cross-cohort study integrates two large longitudinal datasets: Whitehall II and the National Survey for Health and Development (NSHD), on data collected in the Whitehall II study in 2002/2004, 2007/2009 and 2012/2013; and for NSHD in 2006/2010 and 2015. Serial salivary cortisol samples were collected multiple times within a 24-hour period at mean ages 61.2 and 65.9 years in Whitehall II and at age 60-64 from NSHD participants. Cortisol profile is defined using cortisol awakening response (CAR) and am:pm ratio. Cognitive function was measured using the MMSE in Whitehall II and ACE-III in NSHD, harmonised into a thirty-point score. Models were adjusted for age, sex, diagnoses of hypertension, diabetes, BMI, educational attainment and interval between HPAA and cognitive assessments. Results: In fully adjusted models, increased am:pm cortisol ratio was prospectively associated with better later-life cognitive function years later (0.02 fewer errors per SD increase in am:pm cortisol ratio, p<0.01) and verbal fluency (0.03 SD increase in verbal fluency per SD increase in am:pm ratio, p<0.01). Increasing age, lower educational attainment, diagnosis of hypertension, diagnosis of diabetes and increased BMI were associated with worse cognitive function and poorer verbal fluency. There were no associations between depression and later-life cognition or reverse associations between cognition and later-life cortisol profiles. Conclusions: Loss of diurnal HPAA variation is evident in individuals subsequently experiencing more cognitive impairment. It may serve as an early pre-clinical marker of cognitive decline.

Type: Article
Title: Longitudinal associations between diurnal cortisol variation and later life cognitive impairment
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000008729
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000008729
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CC BY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10079071
Downloads since deposit
63Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item