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Task-induced functional brain connectivity mediates the relationship between striatal D2/3 receptors and working memory

Nour, MM; Dahoun, T; McCutcheon, RA; Adams, RA; Wall, MB; Howes, OD; (2019) Task-induced functional brain connectivity mediates the relationship between striatal D2/3 receptors and working memory. eLife , 8 , Article e45045. 10.7554/eLife.45045. Green open access

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Abstract

Working memory performance is thought to depend on both striatal dopamine 2/3 receptors (D2/3Rs) and task-induced functional organisation in key cortical brain networks. Here, we combine functional magnetic resonance imaging and D2/3R positron emission tomography in 51 healthy volunteers, to investigate the relationship between working memory performance, task-induced default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity changes, and striatal D2/3R availability. Increasing working memory load was associated with reduced DMN functional connectivity, which was itself associated with poorer task performance. Crucially, the magnitude of the DMN connectivity reduction correlated with striatal D2/3R availability, particularly in the caudate, and this relationship mediated the relationship between striatal D2/3R availability and task performance. These results inform our understanding of natural variation in working memory performance, and have implications for understanding age-related cognitive decline and cognitive impairments in neuropsychiatric disorders where dopamine signalling is altered.

Type: Article
Title: Task-induced functional brain connectivity mediates the relationship between striatal D2/3 receptors and working memory
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.7554/eLife.45045
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.45045
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Parkinson's disease, dorsal attention network, frontoparietal network, human, neuroscience, schizophrenia, task negative network
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Computer Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10077999
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