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Track-and-Trace: Novel Anti-Counterfeit Measures for 3D Printed Personalised Drug Products using Smart Material Inks

Trenfield, SJ; Xian Tan, H; Awad, A; Buanz, A; Gaisford, S; Basit, AW; Goyanes, A; (2019) Track-and-Trace: Novel Anti-Counterfeit Measures for 3D Printed Personalised Drug Products using Smart Material Inks. International Journal of Pharmaceutics , 567 , Article 118443. 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2019.06.034. Green open access

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Abstract

Printing technologies have been forecast to initiate a new era of personalised medicine in pharmaceuticals. To facilitate integration, a non-destructive and robust method of product authenticity is required. This study reports, for the first time, the interface between 3D printing and 2D inkjet printing technologies in order to fabricate a drug-loaded 3D printed tablet (printlet) with a unique track-and-trace measure in a single step process. In particular, quick response (QR) codes and data matrices were printed onto the surface of polymeric-based printlets for scanning using a smartphone device, and were designed to encode tailored information pertaining to the drug product, patient and prescriber. Moreover, a novel anti-counterfeit strategy was designed, which involved the deposition of a unique combination of material inks for detection using Raman spectroscopy. The inks were characterised for printability by measuring surface tension, viscosity and density, and each were successfully detected on the 3D printed tablet post-printing. Overall, this novel approach will enable an enhanced transparency and tracking of 3D printed medicines across the supply chain, leading to a safer treatment pathway for patients.

Type: Article
Title: Track-and-Trace: Novel Anti-Counterfeit Measures for 3D Printed Personalised Drug Products using Smart Material Inks
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2019.06.034
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2019.06.034
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: 3D printed drug products, Three-dimensional printing, additive manufacturing, counterfeit medicines, falsified medicines, ink-jet printing
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Pharmaceutics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10077426
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