UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Epidemiology of loneliness in a cohort of UK mental health community crisis service users

Wang, J; Lloyd-Evans, B; Marston, L; Ma, R; Mann, F; Solmi, F; Johnson, S; (2019) Epidemiology of loneliness in a cohort of UK mental health community crisis service users. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 10.1007/s00127-019-01734-6. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of Johnson_Epidemiology of loneliness in a cohort of UK mental health community crisis service users_AOP.pdf]
Preview
Text
Johnson_Epidemiology of loneliness in a cohort of UK mental health community crisis service users_AOP.pdf - Published Version

Download (767kB) | Preview

Abstract

PURPOSE: Loneliness is an important issue for mental health service users. However, it has not been a particularly prominent focus of recent mental health research. This paper aimed to explore the severity of loneliness among people leaving mental health community crisis services, and to identify factors associated with loneliness. METHODS: A total of 399 participants experiencing mental health crises recruited for a research trial from community crisis services were included in this cross-sectional study. They completed the eight-item measure of the University of California at Los Angeles Loneliness Scale and a set of instruments assessing socio-demographic, psychosocial, and psychiatric variables. RESULTS: Severity of loneliness was high among people leaving community crisis services. Longer years since first contact with mental health services (2-10 years, coefficient = 1.83, 95% CI 0.49-3.16; more than 10 years, coefficient = 1.91, 95% CI 0.46-3.36) and more severe affective symptoms (coefficient = 0.32, 95% CI 0.23-0.40) were associated with greater loneliness, whereas bigger social network size (coefficient = - 0.56, 95% CI - 0.76 to - 0.36) and greater social capital (coefficient = - 0.16, 95% CI - 0.31 to - 0.003) were associated with less severe loneliness. CONCLUSIONS: This paper supports a view that people experiencing mental health crises often report relatively severe loneliness, and that loneliness tends to become more severe during the course of illness. A greater awareness of loneliness among mental health professionals may be beneficial. Loneliness is a potential focus of the development of interventions to improve the lives and outcomes of people with significant mental health problems.

Type: Article
Title: Epidemiology of loneliness in a cohort of UK mental health community crisis service users
Location: Germany
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00127-019-01734-6
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-019-01734-6
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Correlates, Loneliness, Mental health, Prevalence
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Primary Care and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10077119
Downloads since deposit
64Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item