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A comparative study on the seismic vulnerability of 1970s vs modern tall steel moment-resisting frame buildings

Molina Hutt, C; (2017) A comparative study on the seismic vulnerability of 1970s vs modern tall steel moment-resisting frame buildings. In: Proceedings of the 16th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering (16WCEE 2017). National Information Centre of Earthquake Engineering (NICEE): Santiago, Chile. Green open access

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Abstract

This paper outlines the methodology followed in the risk-based assessment of two archetype tall buildings in downtown San Francisco: a 50 story steel moment resisting frame (MRF) office building designed following the requirements of the Uniform Building Code of 1973 and a 50 story steel MRF office building designed following modern code requirements (International Building Code 2012). The methodology enables the development of the vulnerability function for the archetype buildings under consideration, highlighting loss contribution from (1) collapse, (2) irreparable damage from excessive residual deformations and (3) reparable damage. The goal of this study is to benchmark the performance of older existing steel MRF buildings against modern designs, providing an overall comparison of their seismic vulnerabilities. The results illustrate that existing tall steel MRF buildings from the 1970s are drastically more vulnerable to earthquakes than tall steel MRF buildings designed to modern standards. The vulnerability function for the 1970s archetype building highlights that collapse potential is the highest contributor to the losses, with a collapse fragility characterized by a relatively low median spectral acceleration. The resulting vulnerability function of the modern archetype building indicates that: i) at low ground motion intensities of shaking, losses are influenced by repairable damage; ii) at medium intensities of shaking losses are equally dominated by repairable damage and residual drift rendering the building irreparable; iii) collapse only starts contributing to the loss at large spectral amplitudes, but even then losses are largely dominated by residual drifts. The collapse fragility of the modern archetype building is in agreement with the design objective of modern building codes, which is to produce designs with low probability of collapse under a Maximum Considered Earthquake.

Type: Proceedings paper
Title: A comparative study on the seismic vulnerability of 1970s vs modern tall steel moment-resisting frame buildings
Event: 16th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering (16WCEE 2017)
Location: Santiago, Chile
Dates: 09 January 2017 - 13 January 2017
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: http://www.wcee.nicee.org/wcee/article/16WCEE/WCEE...
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the version of record. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Vulnerability Functions; Tall Buildings; Moment-Resisting Frames; Steel
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Civil, Environ and Geomatic Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10077053
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