UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Location-level processes drive the establishment of alien bird populations worldwide

Redding, DW; Pigot, AL; Dyer, EE; Şekercioğlu, ÇH; Kark, S; Blackburn, TM; (2019) Location-level processes drive the establishment of alien bird populations worldwide. Nature , 571 pp. 103-106. 10.1038/s41586-019-1292-2. Green open access

[thumbnail of Blackburn Redding et al main text+figures.pdf]
Preview
Text
Blackburn Redding et al main text+figures.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Human-mediated translocation of species to areas beyond their natural distribution (which results in 'alien' populations) is a key signature of the Anthropocene, and is a primary global driver of biodiversity loss and environmental change. Stemming the tide of invasions requires understanding why some species fail to establish alien populations, and others succeed. To achieve this, we need to integrate the effects of features of the introduction site, the species introduced and the specific introduction event. Determining which, if any, location-level factors affect the success of establishment has proven difficult, owing to the multiple spatial, temporal and phylogenetic axes along which environmental variation may influence population survival. Here we apply Bayesian hierarchical regression analysis to a global spatially and temporally explicit database of introduction events of alien birds4 to show that environmental conditions at the introduction location, notably climatic suitability and the presence of other groups of alien species, are the primary determinants of successful establishment. Species-level traits and the size of the founding population (propagule pressure) exert secondary, but important, effects on success. Thus, current trajectories of anthropogenic environmental change will most probably facilitate future incursions by alien species, but predicting future invasions will require the integration of multiple location-, species- and event-level characteristics.

Type: Article
Title: Location-level processes drive the establishment of alien bird populations worldwide
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41586-019-1292-2
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-019-1292-2
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Biodiversity, Conservation biology, Invasive species, Macroecology
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Genetics, Evolution and Environment
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10076527
Downloads since deposit
22Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item