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Relationship between adherence to remote monitoring and patient characteristics: observational study in women with pregnancy-induced hypertension

Vandenberk, T; Lanssens, D; Storms, V; Thijs, IM; Bamelis, L; Grieten, L; Gyselaers, W; ... Luyten, P; + view all (2019) Relationship between adherence to remote monitoring and patient characteristics: observational study in women with pregnancy-induced hypertension. JMIR mHealth and uHealth 10.2196/12574. (In press).

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) is associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality in mothers, fetuses, and newborns. New technologies, such as remote monitoring (RM), were introduced in 2015 into the care of patients at risk of PIH in Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg (Genk, Belgium) to improve both maternal and neonatal outcomes. In developing new strategies for obstetric care in pregnant women, including RM, it is important to understand the psychosocial characteristics associated with adherence to RM in order to optimize care. OBJECTIVE: Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the role of patients’ psychosocial characteristics (severity of depression or anxiety, cognitive factors, attachment styles, and personality traits) in their adherence to RM. METHODS: Questionnaires were sent by email to 108 mothers the day after they entered an RM program for pregnant women at risk of PIH. The Generalized Anxiety Disorder Assessment (GAD-7) and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) were used to assess anxiety and the severity of depression, respectively; an adaptation of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) was used to assess cognitive factors; and attachment and personality were measured with the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised Scale (ECR-R), and the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire (DEQ–A) and the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS), respectively. RESULTS: The moderate adherence group showed significantly higher levels of anxiety and depression, negative cognitions and insecure attachment styles, especially compared with the high adherence group. The low adherence group scored significantly higher than the other groups on other-oriented perfectionism. There were no significant differences between the good and high adherence groups. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the relationships between adherence to RM and patient characteristics in women at risk of PIH. Alertness towards the group of women who show less than optimal adherence is essential. These findings call for further research on the management of PIH and the importance of individual tailoring of RM in this patient group.

Type: Article
Title: Relationship between adherence to remote monitoring and patient characteristics: observational study in women with pregnancy-induced hypertension
DOI: 10.2196/12574
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/12574
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10076336
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