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Decellularized Human Gut as a Natural 3D Platform for Research in Intestinal Fibrosis

Giuffrida, P; Curti, M; Al-Akkad, W; Biel, C; Crowley, C; Frenguelli, L; Telese, A; ... Mazza, G; + view all (2019) Decellularized Human Gut as a Natural 3D Platform for Research in Intestinal Fibrosis. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , 25 (11) pp. 1740-1750. 10.1093/ibd/izz115. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The current methodologies for the identification of therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are limited to conventional 2-dimensional (2D) cell cultures and animal models. The use of 3D decellularized human intestinal scaffolds obtained from surgically resected intestine and engineered with human intestinal cells may provide a major advancement in the development of innovative intestinal disease models. The aim of the present study was to design and validate a decellularization protocol for the production of acellular 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds from the human duodenum. METHODS: Scaffolds were characterized by verifying the preservation of the ECM protein composition and 3D architecture of the native intestine and were employed for tissue engineering with primary human intestinal myofibroblasts for up to 14 days. RESULTS: Engrafted cells showed the ability to grow and remodel the surrounding ECM. mRNA expression of key genes involved in ECM turnover was significantly different when comparing primary human intestinal myofibroblasts cultured in 3D scaffolds with those cultured in standard 2D cultures on plastic dishes. Moreover, incubation with key profibrogenic growth factors such as TGFβ1 and PDGF-BB resulted in markedly different effects in standard 2D vs 3D cultures, further emphasizing the importance of using 3D cell cultures. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm the feasibility of 3D culture of human intestinal myofibroblasts in intestinal ECM scaffolds as an innovative platform for disease modeling, biomarker discovery, and drug testing in intestinal fibrosis.

Type: Article
Title: Decellularized Human Gut as a Natural 3D Platform for Research in Intestinal Fibrosis
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/ibd/izz115
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/ibd/izz115
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: 3D ECM scaffold in vitro model, decellularization, human intestinal myofibroblast, tissue regeneration
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inst for Liver and Digestive Hlth
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10076308
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