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The extracellular fluid macromolecular composition differentially affects cell-substrate adhesion and cell morphology

Gonzalez-Molina, J; Mendonça da Silva, J; Fuller, B; Selden, C; (2019) The extracellular fluid macromolecular composition differentially affects cell-substrate adhesion and cell morphology. Scientific Reports , 9 , Article 8505. 10.1038/s41598-019-44960-3. Green open access

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Abstract

Soluble macromolecules present in the tumour microenvironment (TME) alter the physical characteristics of the extracellular fluid and can affect cancer cell behaviour. A fundamental step in cancer progression is the formation of a new vascular network which may originate from both pre-existing normal endothelium and cancer-derived cells. To study the role of extracellular macromolecules in the TME affecting endothelial cells we exposed normal and cancer-derived endothelial cells to inert polymer solutions with different physicochemical characteristics. The cancer cell line SK-HEP-1, but not normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells, responded to high-macromolecular-content solutions by elongating and aligning with other cells, an effect that was molecular weight-dependent. Moreover, we found that neither bulk viscosity, osmotic pressure, nor the fractional volume occupancy of polymers alone account for the induction of these effects. Furthermore, these morphological changes were accompanied by an increased extracellular matrix deposition. Conversely, cell-substrate adhesion was enhanced by polymers increasing the bulk viscosity of the culture medium independently of polymer molecular weight. These results show that the complex macromolecular composition of the extracellular fluid strongly influences cancer-derived endothelial cell behaviour, which may be crucial to understanding the role of the TME in cancer progression.

Type: Article
Title: The extracellular fluid macromolecular composition differentially affects cell-substrate adhesion and cell morphology
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-44960-3
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-44960-3
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2019, Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. Te images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inst for Liver and Digestive Hlth
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10076254
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