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Predictors of moving on from mental health supported accommodation in England: national cohort study

Killaspy, H; Priebe, S; McPherson, P; Zenasni, Z; Greenberg, L; McCrone, P; Dowling, S; ... King, M; + view all (2019) Predictors of moving on from mental health supported accommodation in England: national cohort study. The British Journal of Psychiatry 10.1192/bjp.2019.101. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Around 60 000 people in England live in mental health supported accommodation. There are three main types: residential care, supported housing and floating outreach. Supported housing and floating outreach aim to support service users in moving on to more independent accommodation within 2 years, but there has been little research investigating their effectiveness.AimsA 30-month prospective cohort study investigating outcomes for users of mental health supported accommodation. METHOD: We used random sampling, accounting for relevant geographical variation factors, to recruit 87 services (22 residential care, 35 supported housing and 30 floating outreach) and 619 service users (residential care 159, supported housing 251, floating outreach 209) across England. We contacted services every 3 months to investigate the proportion of service users who successfully moved on to more independent accommodation. Multilevel modelling was used to estimate how much of the outcome and cost variations were due to service type and quality, after accounting for service-user characteristics. RESULTS: Overall 243/586 participants successfully moved on (residential care 15/146, supported housing 96/244, floating outreach 132/196). This was most likely for floating outreach service users (versus residential care: odds ratio 7.96, 95% CI 2.92-21.69, P < 0.001; versus supported housing: odds ratio 2.74, 95% CI 1.01-7.41, P < 0.001) and was associated with reduced costs of care and two aspects of service quality: promotion of human rights and recovery-based practice. CONCLUSIONS: Most people do not move on from supported accommodation within the expected time frame. Greater focus on human rights and recovery-based practice may increase service effectiveness. / Declaration of interest: H.K., S.P., M.K., S.E., P. McCrone, M.A., S.C., G.L. and G.S. report a grant from National Institute of Health Research during the conduct of the study. All other authors report having no conflicts to disclose.

Type: Article
Title: Predictors of moving on from mental health supported accommodation in England: national cohort study
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1192/bjp.2019.101
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.2019.101
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Mental health, cohort, move on, supported accommodation
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10075126
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