UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Positive memory specificity is associated with reduced vulnerability to depression

Askelund, AD; Schweizer, S; Goodyer, IM; van Harmelen, A-L; (2019) Positive memory specificity is associated with reduced vulnerability to depression. Nature Human Behaviour , 3 pp. 265-273. 10.1038/s41562-018-0504-3. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Schweizer AAM Final revision Letter NHB_accepted.pdf - Accepted version

Download (522kB) | Preview

Abstract

Depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide1. Early life stress exposure increases risk for depression2 and has been proposed to sensitize the maturing psychophysiological stress system to stress in later life3. In response to stress, positive memory activation has been found to dampen cortisol responses and improve mood in humans4 and to reduce depression-like behaviour in mice5. We used path modelling to examine whether recalling specific positive memories predicts reduced vulnerability to depression (high morning cortisol6,7,8,9 and negative self-cognitions during low mood10,11,12) in adolescents at risk due to early life stress (n = 427, age 14 years)8. We found that positive memory specificity was associated with lower morning cortisol and fewer negative self-cognitions during low mood over the course of one year. Moderated mediation analyses demonstrated that positive memory specificity was related to lower depressive symptoms through fewer negative self-cognitions in response to negative life events reported in the one-year interval. These findings indicate that recalling specific positive life experiences may be a resilience factor13 that helps in lowering depressive vulnerability in adolescents with a history of early life stress.

Type: Article
Title: Positive memory specificity is associated with reduced vulnerability to depression
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41562-018-0504-3
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-018-0504-3
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10074209
Downloads since deposit
38Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item