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Young people in HIV care in Ukraine: a national survey on characteristics and service provision [version 1; peer review: 2 approved]

Kyselyova, G; Martsynovska, V; Volokha, A; Nizova, N; Malyuta, R; Judd, A; Thorne, C; (2019) Young people in HIV care in Ukraine: a national survey on characteristics and service provision [version 1; peer review: 2 approved]. F1000Research , 8 , Article 323. 10.12688/f1000research.18573.1. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Ukraine’s perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) young people are ageing into adolescence/young adulthood and, alongside those with behaviourally-acquired infections (BHIV), require transitional and other support services. We aimed to map this population and policies/ service provision at specialist HIV centres, to inform future service development. Methods: A national survey was conducted of 28 HIV/AIDS centres on number, characteristics (age group, HIV acquisition mode) and care setting (paediatric/adult) of 10-24 year olds in HIV care in each of 24 regions in January 2016. Information was collected on policies/ service provision at each centre. Results: Of 13,286 young people aged 10-24 years registered for HIV care nationally in Ukraine in January 2016, 1,675 were aged 10-18 years. Three-quarters of ≤19 year olds were PHIV, while 72% of 20-24-year-olds had sexually-acquired infection. Five regions accounted for two-thirds of 10-18 year olds in paediatric and 85% of 19-24 year olds in adult services. In 2015, 97 young people transitioned from paediatric to adult services nationally, typically at 18 years although with flexibility in timing at 17/28 centres. At 27/28 centres, BHIV young people aged <18 years began their HIV care in paediatric services sometimes (5) or always (22). Transition support most commonly consisted of a joint appointment with paediatrician and adult doctor, and support from a psychologist/social worker (both at 24/28 centres). Only 5/28 centres offered routine HIV care during the evening or weekend, and availability of integrated sexual/reproductive health and harm reduction services was uneven. Of 16/28 centres selectively following-up patients who did not attend for care, 15 targeted patients in paediatric services. Conclusions: Heterogeneity in the population and in service availability at the main regional/municipal HIV/ AIDS centres has implications for potential structural barriers to HIV care, and development of services for this group.

Type: Article
Title: Young people in HIV care in Ukraine: a national survey on characteristics and service provision [version 1; peer review: 2 approved]
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.12688/f1000research.18573.1
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.12688/f1000research.18573.1
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2019 Kyselyova G et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licence, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: HIV, youth, adolescents, Ukraine, Eastern Europe, transition, perinatal HIV infection, injecting drug use, reproductive health, harm reduction
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Inst of Clinical Trials and Methodology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Inst of Clinical Trials and Methodology > MRC Clinical Trials Unit at UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10073894
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