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Development of a temperature-controlled phantom for magnetic resonance quality assurance of diffusion, dynamic, and relaxometry measurements

Jerome, NP; Papoutsaki, M-V; Orton, MR; Parkes, HG; Winfield, JM; Boss, MA; Leach, MO; ... Collins, DJ; + view all (2016) Development of a temperature-controlled phantom for magnetic resonance quality assurance of diffusion, dynamic, and relaxometry measurements. Medical Physics , 43 (6) pp. 2998-3007. 10.1118/1.4948997. Green open access

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Abstract

Purpose: Diffusion‐weighted (DW) and dynamic contrast‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are increasingly applied for the assessment of functional tissue biomarkers for diagnosis, lesion characterization, or for monitoring of treatment response. However, these techniques are vulnerable to the influence of various factors, so there is a necessity for a standardized MR quality assurance procedure utilizing a phantom to facilitate the reliable estimation of repeatability of these quantitative biomarkers arising from technical factors (e.g., B1 variation) affecting acquisition on scanners of different vendors and field strengths. The purpose of this study is to present a novel phantom designed for use in quality assurance for multicenter trials, and the associated repeatability measurements of functional and quantitative imaging protocols across different MR vendors and field strengths. Methods: A cylindrical acrylic phantom was manufactured containing 7 vials of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solutions of different concentrations, ranging from 0% (distilled water) to 25% w/w, to create a range of different MR contrast parameters. Temperature control was achieved by equilibration with ice‐water. Repeated MR imaging measurements of the phantom were performed on four clinical scanners (two at 1.5 T, two at 3.0 T; two vendors) using the same scanning protocol to assess the long‐term and short‐term repeatability. The scanning protocol consisted of DW measurements, inversion recovery (IR) T1 measurements, multiecho T2 measurement, and dynamic T1‐weighted sequence allowing multiple variable flip angle (VFA) estimation of T1 values over time. For each measurement, the corresponding calculated parameter maps were produced. On each calculated map, regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn within each vial and the median value of these voxels was assessed. For the dynamic data, the autocorrelation function and their variance were calculated; for the assessment of the repeatability, the coefficients of variation (CoV) were calculated. Results: For both field strengths across the available vendors, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) at 0 °C ranged from (1.12 ± 0.01) × 10−3 mm2/s for pure water to (0.48 ± 0.02) × 10−3 mm2/s for the 25% w/w PVP concentration, presenting a minor variability between the vendors and the field strengths. T2 and IR‐T1 relaxation time results demonstrated variability between the field strengths and the vendors across the different acquisitions. Moreover, the T1 values derived from the VFA method exhibited a large variation compared with the IR‐T1 values across all the scanners for all repeated measurements, although the calculation of the standard deviation of the VFA‐T1 estimate across each ROI and the autocorrelation showed a stability of the signal for three scanners, with autocorrelation of the signal over the dynamic series revealing a periodic variation in one scanner. Finally, the ADC, the T2, and the IR‐T1 values exhibited an excellent repeatability across the scanners, whereas for the dynamic data, the CoVs were higher. Conclusions: The combination of a novel PVP phantom, with multiple compartments to give a physiologically relevant range of ADC and T1 values, together with ice‐water as a temperature‐controlled medium, allows reliable quality assurance measurements that can be used to measure agreement between MRI scanners, critical in multicenter functional and quantitative imaging studies.

Type: Article
Title: Development of a temperature-controlled phantom for magnetic resonance quality assurance of diffusion, dynamic, and relaxometry measurements
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1118/1.4948997
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1118/1.4948997
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: quality assurance, diffusion weighted imaging, quantitative imaging
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Experimental and Translational Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10073644
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