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Progress of children with severe acute malnutrition in the malnutrition treatment centre rehabilitation program: evidence from a prospective study in Jharkhand, India

Chaturvedi, A; Patwari, AK; Soni, D; Pandey, S; Prost, A; Gope, RK; Sharma, J; (2018) Progress of children with severe acute malnutrition in the malnutrition treatment centre rehabilitation program: evidence from a prospective study in Jharkhand, India. Nutrition Journal , 17 , Article 69. 10.1186/s12937-018-0378-2. Green open access

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Abstract

Background In Jharkhand, Malnutrition Treatment Centres (MTCs) have been established to provide care to children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). The study examined the effects of facility- and community based care provided as part the MTC program on children with severe acute malnutrition. Method A cohort of 150 children were enrolled and interviewed by trained investigators at admission, discharge, and after two months on the completion of the community-based phase of the MTC program. Trained investigators collected data on diet, morbidity, anthropometry, and utilization of health and nutrition services. Results We found no deaths among children attending the MTC program. Recovery was poor, and the majority of children demonstrated poor weight gain, with severe wasting and underweight reported in 52 and 83% of the children respectively at the completion of the community-based phase of the MTC program. The average weight gain in the MTC facility (3.8 ± 5.9 g/kg body weight/d) and after discharge (0.6 ± 2.1 g/kg body weight/d) was below recommended standards. 67% of the children consumed food that met less than 50% of the recommended energy and protein requirement. Children experienced high number of illness episodes after discharge: 68% children had coughs and cold, 40% had fever and 35% had diarrhoea. Multiple morbidities were common: 50% of children had two or more episodes of illness. Caregiver’s exposure to MTC’s health and nutrition education sessions and meetings with frontline workers did not improve feeding practices at home. The take-home ration amount distributed to children through the supplementary food program was inadequate to achieve growth benefits. Conclusions Recovery of children during and after the MTC program was suboptimal. This highlights the need for additional support to strengthen MTC program so that effective care to children can be provided.

Type: Article
Title: Progress of children with severe acute malnutrition in the malnutrition treatment centre rehabilitation program: evidence from a prospective study in Jharkhand, India
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s12937-018-0378-2
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12937-018-0378-2
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s). 2018 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: Wasting, Assessment of nutritional status, Severe acute malnutrition, Malnutrition treatment centers, Food and nutrient intake, India
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10073466
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