UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Health-related quality of life and prevalence of six chronic diseases in homeless and housed people: a cross-sectional study in London and Birmingham, England

Lewer, D; Aldridge, RW; Menezes, D; Sawyer, C; Zaninotto, P; Dedicoat, M; Ahmed, I; ... Story, A; + view all (2019) Health-related quality of life and prevalence of six chronic diseases in homeless and housed people: a cross-sectional study in London and Birmingham, England. BMJ Open , 9 (4) , Article e025192. 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-025192. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
e025192.full.pdf - Published version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To compare health-related quality of life and prevalence of chronic diseases in housed and homeless populations. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey with an age-matched and sex-matched housed comparison group. SETTING: Hostels, day centres and soup runs in London and Birmingham, England. PARTICIPANTS: Homeless participants were either sleeping rough or living in hostels and had a history of sleeping rough. The comparison group was drawn from the Health Survey for England. The study included 1336 homeless and 13 360 housed participants. OUTCOME MEASURES: Chronic diseases were self-reported asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), epilepsy, heart problems, stroke and diabetes. Health-related quality of life was measured using EQ-5D-3L. RESULTS: Housed participants in more deprived neighbourhoods were more likely to report disease. Homeless participants were substantially more likely than housed participants in the most deprived quintile to report all diseases except diabetes (which had similar prevalence in homeless participants and the most deprived housed group). For example, the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was 1.1% (95% CI 0.7% to 1.6%) in the least deprived housed quintile; 2.0% (95% CI 1.5% to 2.6%) in the most deprived housed quintile; and 14.0% (95% CI 12.2% to 16.0%) in the homeless group. Social gradients were also seen for problems in each EQ-5D-3L domain in the housed population, but homeless participants had similar likelihood of reporting problems as the most deprived housed group. The exception was problems related to anxiety, which were substantially more common in homeless people than any of the housed groups. CONCLUSIONS: While differences in health between housed socioeconomic groups can be described as a 'slope', differences in health between housed and homeless people are better understood as a 'cliff'.

Type: Article
Title: Health-related quality of life and prevalence of six chronic diseases in homeless and housed people: a cross-sectional study in London and Birmingham, England
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-025192
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-025192
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported (CC BY 4.0) license, which permits others to copy, redistribute, remix, transform and build upon this work for any purpose, provided the original work is properly cited, a link to the licence is given, and indication of whether changes were made. See: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: epidemiology, homelessness, inequality, public health
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10073378
Downloads since deposit
71Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item