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Encapsulation of macrophages enhances their retention and angiogenic potential

Ludwinski, FE; Patel, AS; Damodaran, G; Cho, J; Furmston, J; Xu, Q; Jayasinghe, SN; ... Modarai, B; + view all (2019) Encapsulation of macrophages enhances their retention and angiogenic potential. npj Regenerative Medicine , 4 , Article 6. 10.1038/s41536-019-0068-5. Green open access

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Abstract

Cell therapies to treat critical limb ischaemia have demonstrated only modest results in clinical trials, and this has been partly attributed to poor cell retention following their delivery directly into the ischaemic limb. The aim of this study was to determine whether alginate encapsulation of therapeutic pro-angio/arteriogenic macrophages enhances their retention and ultimately improves limb perfusion. A reproducible GMP-compliant method for generating 300 µm alginate capsules was developed to encapsulate pro-angio/arteriogenic macrophages. Longitudinal analysis revealed no detrimental effect of encapsulation on cell number or viability in vitro, and macrophages retained their pro-angio/arteriogenic phenotype. Intramuscular delivery of encapsulated macrophages into the murine ischaemic hindlimb demonstrated increased cell retention compared with injection of naked cells (P = 0.0001), and that this was associated both enhanced angiogenesis (P = 0.02) and arteriogenesis (P = 0.03), and an overall improvement in limb perfusion (P = 0.0001). Alginate encapsulation of pro-angio/arteriogenic macrophages enhances cell retention and subsequent limb reperfusion in vivo. Encapsulation may therefore represent a means of improving the efficacy of cell-based therapies currently under investigation for the treatment of limb ischaemia.

Type: Article
Title: Encapsulation of macrophages enhances their retention and angiogenic potential
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41536-019-0068-5
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41536-019-0068-5
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Mechanical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10073017
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