UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Searching for the territorial origins of England

Brookes, S; (2019) Searching for the territorial origins of England. [Review]. Antiquity , 93 (367) pp. 264-266. 10.15184/aqy.2018.263. Green open access

[thumbnail of Brookes_Searching for the territorial origins of England_AAM.pdf]
Preview
Text
Brookes_Searching for the territorial origins of England_AAM.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (135kB) | Preview

Abstract

When the Normans arrived in England in AD 1066 they found a kingdom divided into a distinctive and complicated administrative geography. In compiling Domesday Book, the great survey of holdings and liabilities over much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086, the assessors grouped information firstly into ‘shires’—districts that are in many cases the precursors of modern counties—and then into smaller divisions such as hundreds, wapentakes and vills (estates), with additional groupings such as multiple hundreds and regional ealdormanries also discernible in the source. These administrative entities clearly had a territorial composition. Using the boundaries of estates, parishes and hundreds mapped at later dates, numerous scholars have sought to reconstruct the administrative geography described in Domesday Book. The resulting maps have, in turn, been interpreted as the product of several centuries of developing territoriality and of continual social and political change. The shires of Norfolk and Suffolk (the ‘north’ and ‘south folk’), for example, appear to fossilise the extents of the kingdom of the East Anglians as it existed 300 or 400 years before Domesday survey; in other cases, clusters of hundreds have been argued to represent post-Roman tribal groupings.

Type: Article
Title: Searching for the territorial origins of England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.15184/aqy.2018.263
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2018.263
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Institute of Archaeology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10071460
Downloads since deposit
199Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item